Derek D. Rucker
Northwestern University
AdvertisingMetacognitionConsumption (economics)BusinessPsychologyEconomicsMarketingCognitionCognitive psychologyPerspective (graphical)Consumer behaviourPerceptionPower (social and political)Value (ethics)PersuasionAttitude strengthAffect (psychology)Attitude changeCertaintySocial psychology
217Publications
52H-index
15.6kCitations
Publications 205
Newest
Abstract null null Inferring individuals’ social rank—their position within a hierarchy—is central to many interactions. But, how do observers assess actors’ social rank? The current article reviews three broad sources of social-rank cues: physical characteristics, behaviors, and possessions. First, observers infer an actor’s social rank from ancestral stereotypes tethered to physical characteristics. Second, observers ascribe social rank to an actor from behaviors that range from nonverbal comm...
Source
#1Derek D. Rucker (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 52
#1Derek D. Rucker (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 3
This article puts forth a perspective that attitudes and attitude strength can serve as precursors to object attachment. To help the reader understand this perspective, I provide an overview of the attitude and attitude strength constructs and distinguish them from object attachment. I then explain a number of prominent ways in which attitudes and attitude strength can influence a variety of behaviors that might be important contributors to object attachment. In doing so, this paper offers resea...
Source
#1Monika LisjakH-Index: 4
#2Andrea BonezziH-Index: 8
Last. Derek D. RuckerH-Index: 52
view all 3 authors...
This research illustrates how marketing perks can be leveraged to spur WOM. We introduce a previously-overlooked, yet practically-relevant dimension on which perks differ: contractuality. Contractu...
Source
#1Matthew D. Rocklage (University of Massachusetts Boston)H-Index: 9
#2Derek D. Rucker (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 52
Last. Loran F. Nordgren (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Online reviews promise to provide people with immediate access to the wisdom of the crowds. Yet, half of all reviews on Amazon and Yelp provide the most positive rating possible, despite human behaviour being substantially more varied in nature. We term the challenge of discerning success within this sea of positive ratings the ‘positivity problem’. Positivity, however, is only one facet of individuals’ opinions. We propose that one solution to the positivity problem lies with the emotionality o...
Source
#1Matthew D. Rocklage (University of Massachusetts Boston)H-Index: 9
#2Derek D. Rucker (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 52
Last. Loran F. Nordgren (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Source
Source
#1Zoey Chen (UM: University of Miami)H-Index: 7
#2Ryan Hamilton (Emory University)H-Index: 13
Last. Derek D. Rucker (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
Research has documented the psychological phenomenon in which the trip back from a destination is experienced as shorter than the trip to the destination. Deemed the “return trip effect” (RTE), pri...
Source
#1Derek D. Rucker (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 52
#2Zakary L. Tormala (Stanford University)H-Index: 38
Source
#1Mengran XuH-Index: 2
#2Pablo BriñolH-Index: 46
Last. Richard E. PettyH-Index: 143
view all 6 authors...
Source
#1David Gal (College of Business Administration)H-Index: 18
#1David Gal (College of Business Administration)
Last. Derek D. Rucker (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 3
view all 2 authors...
How do people respond to risk in important life decisions? For example, when presented with the opportunity to leave one's job to start a business-a risky proposition for most-or to stay put-often a safer course of action-what do people choose? The current work explores the idea that important life decisions offer people the opportunity to display a highly valued psychological characteristic: courage. Specifically, important life decisions often combine the critical preconditions for a risky cho...
Source