Manuel Varlet
University of Sydney
MetronomeMotor coordinationSocial relationRhythmDevelopmental psychologyEntrainment (biomusicology)Stimulus (physiology)PsychologyInterpersonal communicationNeuroscienceEntrainment (chronobiology)Visual perceptionCognitive psychologyPerceptionMovement (music)Interpersonal coordinationComputer scienceCommunicationElectroencephalographyAudiologyMusicalPhysical medicine and rehabilitation
67Publications
17H-index
987Citations
Publications 61
Newest
#1Tomas Lenc (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 5
#2Hugo Merchant (UNAM: National Autonomous University of Mexico)H-Index: 37
Last. Sylvie Nozaradan (UCL: Université catholique de Louvain)H-Index: 16
view all 0 authors...
Humans perceive and spontaneously move to one or several levels of periodic pulses (a meter, for short) when listening to musical rhythm, even when the sensory input does not provide prominent peri...
1 CitationsSource
#1Patti Nijhuis (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 2
#2Peter E. Keller (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 51
Last. Manuel Varlet (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 17
view all 4 authors...
People have a natural and intrinsic ability to coordinate body movements with rhythms surrounding them, known as sensorimotor synchronisation. This can be observed in daily environments, when dancing or singing along with music, or spontaneously walking, talking or applauding in synchrony with one another. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying accurately synchronised movement with selected rhythms in the environment remain unclear. Here we studied real and imagined sensorimotor s...
1 CitationsSource
Because work songs are ubiquitous around the world, singing while working and performing a task with a coactor is presumably beneficial for both joint action and individual task performance. The present study investigated the impact of interpersonal rhythmic vocal interaction on interpersonal phase relations and on individual motor timing performance, which was evaluated by a synchronization-continuation paradigm requiring whole-body movement with or without visual contact. Participants repeated...
1 CitationsSource
#1Cécile J Bouvet (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 2
#2Manuel Varlet (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 17
Last. Benoît G. BardyH-Index: 38
view all 5 authors...
Humans spontaneously synchronize their movements with external auditory rhythms such as a metronome or music. Although such synchronization preferentially occurs toward a simple 1:1 movement–sound frequency ratio, the parameters facilitating spontaneous synchronization to more complex frequency ratios remain largely unclear. The present study investigates the dynamics of spontaneous auditory–motor synchronization at a range of frequency ratios between movement and sound, and examines the benefit...
4 CitationsSource
#1Cécile J Bouvet (University of Montpellier)H-Index: 2
#2Benoît G. Bardy (University of Montpellier)H-Index: 38
Last. Manuel Varlet (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 17
view all 6 authors...
Human rhythmic movements spontaneously synchronize with auditory rhythms at various frequency ratios. The emergence of more complex relationships, for instance, frequency ratios of 1:2 and 1:3, is enhanced by adding a congruent accentuation pattern (binary for 1:2 and ternary for 1:3), resulting in a 1:1 movement-accentuation relationship. However, this benefit of accentuation on movement synchronization appears to be stronger for the ternary pattern than for the binary pattern. Here, we investi...
2 CitationsSource
#1Tomas Lenc (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 5
#2Peter E. Keller (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 51
Last. Sylvie Nozaradan (UCL: Université catholique de Louvain)H-Index: 16
view all 4 authors...
Abstract When listening to music, humans spontaneously perceive and synchronize movement to periodic pulses of meter. A growing body of evidence suggests that this widespread ability is related to neural processes that selectively enhance meter periodicities. However, to what extent these neural processes are affected by the attentional state of the listener remains largely unknown. Here, we recorded EEG while participants listened to auditory rhythms and detected small changes in tempo or pitch...
Source
#1Manuel Varlet (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 17
#2Sylvie Nozaradan (UCL: Université catholique de Louvain)H-Index: 16
Last. Peter E. Keller (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 51
view all 4 authors...
2 CitationsSource
#1Ian D. ColleyH-Index: 3
#2Manuel Varlet (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 17
Last. Peter E. KellerH-Index: 51
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Abstract Interpersonal coordination is exemplified in ensemble musicians, who coordinate their actions deliberately in order to achieve temporal synchronisation in their performances. However, musicians also move parts of their bodies unintentionally or spontaneously, sometimes in ways that do not directly produce sound from their instruments. Musicians' movements—intentional or otherwise—provide visual signals to co-performers, which might facilitate temporal synchronisation. In large ensembles...
Source
#1Tomas Lenc (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 5
#2Peter E. Keller (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 51
Last. Sylvie Nozaradan (UCL: Université catholique de Louvain)H-Index: 16
view all 4 authors...
5 CitationsSource
#1Manuel Varlet (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 17
#2Rohan B.H. Williams (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 16
Last. Peter E. Keller (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 51
view all 3 authors...
Human movements spontaneously entrain to auditory rhythms, which can help to stabilise movements in time and space. The properties of auditory rhythms supporting the occurrence of this phenomenon, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we investigate in two experiments the effects of pitch and tempo on spontaneous movement entrainment and stabilisation. We examined spontaneous entrainment of hand-held pendulum swinging in time with low-pitched (100 Hz) and high-pitched (1600 Hz) metronomes to te...
11 CitationsSource