Nate Seltenrich
Yale University
Environmental resource managementEnvironmental chemistryInternal medicineClimate changeEndocrinologyPublic healthBusinessFood chainPediatricsEcologyChinaGeographyFood contact materialsMEDLINEPlastic pollutionContext (language use)Published ErratumEnvironmental exposureAir pollutantsHuman healthPotential riskFine particulateEnvironmental scienceProduct (business)Environmental monitoringWaste managementAir pollutionSmokeMedicineFood packagingBiologyEnvironmental health
66Publications
12H-index
519Citations
Publications 69
Newest
Hot days can be deadly, 1 so public health officials seek to mitigate their effects through heat action plans. These plans have been widely adopted, but little is known about how effective they really are at reducing the public health burden of high temperatures. A new study quantifies the effectiveness of one city’s plan for handling heat. 2
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Intrauterine inflammation (IUI) is a risk factor for a variety of adverse birth outcomes, 1 , 2 , 3 and some investigators have hypothesized it could also play a role in the risk of being born preterm or underweight. 4 , 5 , 6 Several other studies have demonstrated that a pregnant woman’s exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) appears to increase her baby’s risk of being born preterm or underweight. 7 , 8 , 9 A new study bridges these lines of inquiry and offers evidence that IUI is associ...
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The island city-state of Singapore reported a record 2,441 cases of dengue fever in January 2016, 1 triggered by all-time-high temperatures in the preceding weeks. 2 , 3 Singapore is a potential hotbed for the widespread disease thanks to its tropical climate and highly urbanized environment. But it’s also a leader in mitigating the spread of dengue virus through an advanced mosquito control program, 4 aided in the past 3 years by a sophisticated model to forecast dengue outbreaks. 5
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Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with cardiovascular health impacts including increased risk of irregular heartbeat and pulmonary embolism (arterial blockage). 1 However, the relationship between PM2.5 and renal function, an independent cardiovascular risk factor23 and significant health metric in its own right, 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 is poorly understood. A new longitudinal study offers early evidence that PM2.5 exposure is associated with lower kidney function and a higher rate...
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Air pollution isn’t just bad for those who breathe it; it also could potentially impact the future health of unborn babies. For instance, maternal exposures to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have been associated with small but consistent decreases in birth weight. 1 , 2 , 3 However, associations with preterm birth have been less consistent. A new study of more than 258,000 New York City births published this month in EHP takes an innovative approach to this question b...
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Environ Health Perspect 123(2):A34–A41 (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.123-A34 In the following sentence, the amount of plastics produced in 1950 was incorrectly cited as “approximately 1.9 tons”: “World plastics production has experienced almost constant growth for more than half a century, rising from approximately 1.9 tons in 1950…” The correct number should have been 1.9 million tons. EHP regrets the error.
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Incineration is a dirty word in the United States, at least where trash is involved. We’ve been burning municipal solid waste (MSW) since the 1880s. But the dawning of the environmental movement eight decades later cast new light on the nitrous oxides, dioxins, and other chemicals emitted from as many as 600 mass-burn incinerators nationwide, which meanwhile had also grown in size. 1 , 2 The ecological merits of resource conservation and recycling became another area of growing interest. Three e...
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From monitoring harmful algal blooms to predicting the spread of infectious diseases, recent advances in satellite-based remote sensing have been a boon to environmental health science.1 In particular, the capacity to assess air quality from space is built on decades of work now beginning to pay dividends. This issue of EHP includes the first global estimate of long-term changes in ground-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2), offering a new tool for evaluating how land-use and policy decisions influence...
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In early December 2015 Beijing made the international news for its hazardous, heavily polluted air, culminating with the city’s first-ever air-pollution “red alert,” a designation that closed schools and strictly limited vehicle traffic for three days.1 A similar scare occurred in January 2013, when hourly readings of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels in the Chinese capital peaked at 886 µg/m3.2 (By comparison, the World Health Organization recommends that PM2.5 averaged over 24 hours not e...
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Climate change is expected to have profound effects on weather patterns and temperatures worldwide in the coming decades, with serious implications for public health.1 Among the many ways in which global warming bears on human health,2,3,4,5,6 few are more readily apparent than the trend of increasing heat waves, which are often regarded as the deadliest of all natural disasters.7,8 And despite current and future adaptation efforts,9,10 the overall health burden of heat waves could grow as avera...
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