Martin Reimann
University of Arizona
Product (category theory)Consumption (economics)BusinessPsychologyMarketingCommoditizationCognitionPolitical scienceMediationCognitive psychologyConsumer behaviourConsumer neuroscienceValue (ethics)Functional magnetic resonance imagingCompetition (economics)Affect (psychology)Cost leadershipKnowledge managementStructural equation modelingSocial psychologyMarketing strategy
87Publications
19H-index
1,689Citations
Publications 79
Newest
AbstractMaladaptive consumption represents potentially uncontrollable and self- and others-harming consumer choices to fulfill a desire for rewarding substances and behaviors. More recently, malada...
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#1Oliver Schilke (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 26
#2Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 19
Last. Karen S. Cook (Stanford University)H-Index: 48
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Trust is key to understanding the dynamics of social relations, to the extent that it is often viewed as the glue that holds society together. We review the mounting sociological literature to help...
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#1Kyra WigginH-Index: 1
#2Martin ReimannH-Index: 19
Last. Shailendra Pratap JainH-Index: 14
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#1C. Clark Cao (Lingnan University)
#2Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 19
This article reviews a wide range of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies conducted in the field of consumer neuroscience to (1) highlight common interpretative approaches of neuroimaging data (i.e., forward inference and reverse inference), (2) discuss potential interpretative issues associated with these approaches, and (3) provide a framework that employs a multi-method approach aimed to possibly raise the explanatory power and, thus, the validity of functional neuroimaging re...
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#1Alberto LopezH-Index: 3
#2Martin ReimannH-Index: 19
Last. Raquel CastañoH-Index: 10
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AbstractConsumer research suggests that cool products demonstrate autonomy by diverging from the norm. However, many products that diverge from the norm seem funny or simply bad rather than cool. What distinguishes products that look cool from those that look funny? We integrate prior research to propose a theory of how consumers respond to unusual product designs. Four experiments provide converging evidence that the design of cool products diverges from the norm in ways that make sense (i.e., ...
4 CitationsSource
#1Kyra L WigginH-Index: 1
#2Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 19
Last. Shailendra Pratap Jain (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 14
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Given curiosity’s characterization as a motivational drive for knowledge, prior research has primarily focused on curiosity’s positive effects on knowledge exploration, information acquisition, and learning. Once the desired knowledge has been acquired, curiosity is said to be satisfied. But what happens if curiosity is left unsatisfied? Across five experiments, spanning four domains of indulgence-related decisions and relying on different methods of curiosity elicitation, the present research s...
12 CitationsSource
#1David Flores (Tec: Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education)H-Index: 1
#2Martin Reimann (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 19
Last. Alberto Lopez (Tec: Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education)H-Index: 3
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: Across 4 experiments, this research is the first to uncover the interaction effect of food type (indulgent vs. healthy) and food presentation order (first vs. last) on individuals' sequential food choices and their overall caloric intake. This work showed that, when selecting foods in a sequence (e.g., at a buffet or on a food ordering website), individuals are influenced by the first item they see and tend to make their subsequent food choices on the basis of this first item. This notion can ...
2 CitationsSource