Taylor W. Wadian
University of Cincinnati
FeelingSocial relationFault (power engineering)Developmental psychologyAttributionNonverbal communicationOutcome (game theory)PsychologyStatutory lawProsocial behaviorInterpersonal communicationHuman factors and ergonomicsCognitionConstruct (philosophy)SelfPolitical scienceOccupational safety and healthInjury preventionMoral psychologyMoral authorityMoralityPerceptionSocial cognitive theory of moralityControl (management)Anecdotal evidenceSelf-conceptStereotypeCheatingSanctionsSympathyMoral couragePositive and Negative Affect ScheduleOverweightPrisonAttention deficit hyperactivity disorderAlcohol abuseFAVORABLE RESPONSEPeer evaluationPeer relationsInterpersonal behaviorMoral behaviorBehavioral responseMoral identityPoison controlEarly adolescentsLived experienceLife eventsCuriosityAffect (psychology)Self-consciousnessLegal guardianAttribution biasComprehensionSuicide preventionFederalismReading (process)DemocracyMoral disengagementIntervention (law)Clinical psychologyCriminologyMoral developmentExpression (mathematics)Social psychologyLegislatureSocial cognitionMoral reasoningPolitics
14Publications
3H-index
30Citations
Publications 15
Newest
#1Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
#2Taylor W. Wadian (UC: University of Cincinnati)H-Index: 3
Abstract null null The tendency to be a moral rebel reflects an important characteristic assessing individuals' propensity to resist, oppose, and confront morally problematic situations when otherwise failing to do so would compromise their values. After constructing and establishing a measure of the tendency to be a moral rebel (studies 1 and 2), individuals' tendency to be a moral rebel was shown to predict their actual resistance to morally problematic situations (study 3). Further, individua...
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#2Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
view all 4 authors...
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#1Wendy Calaway (UC: University of Cincinnati)H-Index: 1
#2Jennifer Kinsley (Northern Kentucky University)H-Index: 2
Last. Taylor W. Wadian (UC: University of Cincinnati)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
Legislative efforts to bring consistency to criminal sentencing outcomes has been much discussed in academic literature and Congressional hearings alike. Despite these efforts disparate sentencing outcomes persist. Researchers have studied many variables seeking to understand these disparities but have been unable to form a consensus around the cause. Perhaps because of the lack of a firm understanding of the issue among researchers, legislative intervention at both the state and federal level h...
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#1Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
#2Jessica L. McManus (Carroll College)H-Index: 5
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 21
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ABSTRACTWhen morality is important and central to individuals’ identities (moral identity), it may heighten their sense of responsibility to behave in moral ways. Although research has linked moral...
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#1Taylor W. Wadian (UC: University of Cincinnati)H-Index: 3
#2Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
Last. Mark A. Barnett (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 4 authors...
A total of 184 adults read descriptions of six hypothetical children with various undesirable characteristics (i.e., being extremely overweight, extremely aggressive, extremely shy, a poor student,...
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#1Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
#2Taylor W. Wadian (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Sarah M. Bailey (Xavier University)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
Extending previous research on the characteristics associated with adolescents’ general tendency to be a moral rebel (Sonnentag & Barnett, 2016), the present study examined the roles of moral identity and (general and situation-specific) moral courage characteristics on 3 (i.e., caring, just, and brave) expressions of the tendency to stand up for one’s beliefs and values despite social pressure not to do so. Results revealed that general and situation-specific moral courage characteristics are i...
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#1Tucker L. Jones (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
#2Taylor W. Wadian (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Lauren N. Pino (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 1
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTThe present study was designed to (a) examine 5- to 8-year-old children's ability to discriminate between antisocial and prosocial teases and (b) determine whether their age and experiences within the home are associated with their ability to recognize these two types of teases. Results revealed that the 5- to 8-year-old children were able to discriminate between antisocial and prosocial teases. Although the children's parents or legal guardians indicated that the children had more frequ...
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#1Taylor W. Wadian (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
#2Mark A. Barnett (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
Last. Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTSecond- through fourth-grade students were read a storybook that described a typical boy who interacted with an obese boy for one of four reasons (sympathy, curiosity, teacher instructed, or no reason) to explore the manner in which a typical storybook character's reason for associating with an obese storybook character influences children's responses to both characters. Results revealed that the children responded more favorably to the obese storybook character after than before learnin...
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#1Tucker L. Jones (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
#2Mark A. Barnett (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
Last. Tammy L. Sonnentag (Xavier University)H-Index: 3
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTThis study sought to examine the extent to which undergraduates' experiences with and attitudes relevant to rejection may be associated with their emotional and behavioral responses to ambiguous social situations in which rejection might be inferred. Undergraduate students completed questionnaires that assessed their experiences with and attitudes relevant to being rejected. Next, each participant read six hypothetical scenarios that described various situations that could be interpreted...
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#1Taylor W. Wadian (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
#2Tucker L. Jones (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Mark A. Barnett (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 4 authors...
A total of 116 adolescents, ranging in age from 15 to 19 years, completed a questionnaire that assessed their experiences with cyberbullying, what they would do if they were a victim of cyberbullying, and what they believed their parents would recommend they do if they were a victim of cyberbullying. The proportion of adolescents who reported ever being cyberbullied was larger than the proportion of adolescents who reported ever cyberbullying another person. In addition, the adolescents reported...
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