Dario Cvencek
University of Washington
Developmental psychologySocial psychology (sociology)PsychologyPsychometricsCognitive psychologyStandardized testImplicit attitudeSelf-conceptStereotypeSelf-esteemTest (assessment)Depression (differential diagnoses)Implicit-association testGender identityMathematical abilityImplicit explicitAnxietyClinical psychologySocial psychologySocial cognitionSocial identity theory
26Publications
11H-index
921Citations
Publications 26
Newest
#1Dario Cvencek (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
#2Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
Last. Manu Kapur (NIE: National Institute of Education)H-Index: 25
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In social psychology, cognitive consistency is a powerful principle for organizing psychological concepts. There have been few tests of cognitive consistency in children and no research about cognitive consistency in children from Asian cultures, who pose an interesting developmental case. A sample of 172 Singaporean elementary school children completed implicit and explicit measures of math–gender stereotype (male = math), gender identity (me = male), and math self-concept (me = math). Results ...
82 CitationsSource
#1Andrew Scott Baron (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 19
#2Toni Schmader (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 43
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 4 authors...
Source
#1Dario CvencekH-Index: 11
#2Anthony G. GreenwaldH-Index: 111
Last. Andrew N. MeltzoffH-Index: 112
view all 3 authors...
18 Citations
#1Dario Cvencek (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
#2Anthony G. Greenwald (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 111
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 3 authors...
Abstract The Preschool Implicit Association Test (PSIAT) is an adaptation of an established social cognition measure (IAT) for use with preschool children. Two studies with 4-year-olds found that the PSIAT was effective in evaluating (a) attitudes toward commonly liked objects (flowers = good) and (b) gender attitudes (girl = good or boy = good). The gender attitude PSIAT was positively correlated with corresponding explicit attitude measures and also children’s actual sex. The new implicit and ...
83 CitationsSource
#1Dario Cvencek (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
#2Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
Last. Anthony G. Greenwald (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 111
view all 3 authors...
A total of 247 American children between 6 and 10 years of age (126 girls and 121 boys) completed Implicit Association Tests and explicit self-report measures assessing the association of (a) me with male (gender identity), (b) male with math (math–gender stereotype), and (c) me with math (math self-concept). Two findings emerged. First, as early as second grade, the children demonstrated the American cultural stereotype that math is for boys on both implicit and explicit measures. Second, eleme...
401 CitationsSource
#1Dario Cvencek (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
#2Anthony G. Greenwald (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 111
Last. Robert Jefferson Snowden (Cardiff University)H-Index: 56
view all 5 authors...
Male and female participants were instructed to produce an altered response pattern on an Implicit Association Test measure of gender identity by slowing performance in trials requiring the same response to stimuli designating own gender and self. Participants' faking success was found to be predictable by a measure of slowing relative to unfaked performances. This combined task slowing (CTS) indicator was then applied in reanalyses of three experiments from other laboratories, two involving ins...
73 CitationsSource