Likeness, Familiarity, and the Ambient Portrait Average

Published on Apr 7, 2020in Perception1.49
· DOI :10.1177/0301006620905420
Susan Hayes6
Estimated H-index: 6
(UOW: University of Wollongong),
Peter Caputi62
Estimated H-index: 62
(UOW: University of Wollongong)
+ 9 AuthorsJoyce Wilcock1
Estimated H-index: 1
Sources
Abstract
This artist-led research project involved 10 visual artists producing 10 ambient portraits and a portrait average of a locally familiar Sitter, and 10 ambient portraits and a portrait average of a ...
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
1855
1 Author (Hiram Powers)
References20
Newest
#1Kay L. Ritchie (University of Lincoln)H-Index: 12
#2David White (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 67
Last. A. Mike Burton (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 64
view all 6 authors...
Low‐quality images are problematic for face identification, for example, when the police identify faces from CCTV images. Here, we test whether face averages, comprising multiple poor‐quality images, can improve both human and computer recognition. We created averages from multiple pixelated or nonpixelated images and compared accuracy using these images and exemplars. To provide a broad assessment of the potential benefits of this method, we tested human observers (n = 88; Experiment 1), and al...
Source
#1Susan Hayes (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 6
#2Nick RheinbergerH-Index: 1
Last. Gordon G. Wallace (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 130
view all 18 authors...
An artist-led exploration of portrait accuracy and likeness involved 12 Artists producing 12 portraits referencing a life-size 3D print of the same Sitter. The works were assessed during a public exhibition, and the resulting likeness assessments were compared to portrait accuracy as measured using geometric morphometrics (statistical shape analysis). Our results are that, independently of the assessors' prior familiarity with the Sitter’s face, the likeness judgements tended to be higher for le...
Source
#1Kay L. Ritchie (University of Lincoln)H-Index: 12
#2Robin S. S. Kramer (University of Lincoln)H-Index: 19
Last. A. Mike Burton (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 64
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Photographs of people are commonly said to be ‘good likenesses’ or ‘poor likenesses’, and this is a concept that we readily understand. Despite this, there has been no systematic investigation of what makes an image a good likeness, or of which cognitive processes are involved in making such a judgement. In three experiments, we investigate likeness judgements for different types of images: natural images of film stars (Experiment 1), images of film stars from specific films (Experiment...
Source
#1Kay L. Ritchie (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 12
#2A. Mike Burton (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 64
ABSTRACTResearch on face learning has tended to use sets of images that vary systematically on dimensions such as pose and illumination. In contrast, we have proposed that exposure to naturally varying images of a person may be a critical part of the familiarization process. Here, we present two experiments investigating face learning with “ambient images”—relatively unconstrained photos taken from internet searches. Participants learned name and face associations for unfamiliar identities prese...
Source
#1David White (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 67
#2Amy L. Burton (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 8
Last. Richard I. Kemp (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 31
view all 3 authors...
Photo-identification is based on the premise that photographs are representative of facial appearance. However, previous studies show that ratings of likeness vary across different photographs of the same face, suggesting that some images capture identity better than others. Two experiments were designed to examine the relationship between likeness judgments and face matching accuracy. In Experiment 1, we compared unfamiliar face matching accuracy for self-selected and other-selected high-likene...
Source
#1F. James Rohlf (SUNY: State University of New York System)H-Index: 54
The development and the present state of the “tps” series of software for use in geometric morphometrics on Windows-based computers are described. These programs have been used in hundreds of studies in mammals and other organisms. Download the complete issue.
Source
#1Sally Andrews (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 33
#2Rob Jenkins (Ebor: University of York)H-Index: 28
Last. A. Mike Burton (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 64
view all 4 authors...
We are usually able to recognize novel instances of familiar faces with little difficulty, yet recognition of unfamiliar faces can be dramatically impaired by natural within-person variability in appearance. In a card-sorting task for facial identity, different photos of the same unfamiliar face are often seen as different people. Here we report two card-sorting experiments in which we manipulate whether participants know the number of identities present. Without constraints, participants sort f...
Source
Source
#1David White (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 67
#2A. Mike Burton (Aberd.: University of Aberdeen)H-Index: 64
Last. Richard I. Kemp (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Viewers find it difficult to match photos of unfamiliar faces for identity. Despite this, the use of photographic ID is widespread. In this study we ask whether it is possible to improve face matching performance by replacing single photographs on ID documents with multiple photos or an average image of the bearer. In 3 experiments we compare photo-to-photo matching with photo-to-average matching (where the average is formed from multiple photos of the same person) and photo-to-array matching (w...
Source
#1Susan Hayes (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 6
#2Cameron Tullberg (Victoria Police)H-Index: 1
Research into witness identification images typically occurs within the laboratory and involves subjective likeness and recognizability judgments. This study analyzed whether actual witness identification images systematically alter the facial shapes of the suspects described. The shape analysis tool, geometric morphometrics, was applied to 46 homologous facial landmarks displayed on 50 witness identification images and their corresponding arrest photographs, using principal component analysis a...
Source
Cited By1
Newest
#1Susan Hayes (UOW: University of Wollongong)H-Index: 6
This case study is an initial exploration as to whether the depiction of texture in a set of portraits, all portraying the same Sitter, is related to the familiar likeness assessments reported in a...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.