Daily Fantasy Sports Players: Gambling, Addiction, and Mental Health Problems.

Published on Jan 19, 2018in Journal of Gambling Studies3.655
路 DOI :10.1007/S10899-018-9744-4
Lia Nower24
Estimated H-index: 24
(RU: Rutgers University),
Kyle R. Caler5
Estimated H-index: 5
(RU: Rutgers University)
+ 1 AuthorsAlex Blaszczynski75
Estimated H-index: 75
(USYD: University of Sydney)
Sources
Abstract
Studies point to a relationship between fantasy sports/daily fantasy sports (DFS) play and gambling behavior. However, little is known about the nature of those relationships, particularly regarding the development of gambling problems. This study investigates the nature, frequency, and preferences of gambling behavior as well as problem gambling severity and comorbid conditions among DFS players. Data were collected from an epidemiologic survey of 3634 New Jersey residents on gambling and leisure activities. Participants were contacted by phone (land-line and cell) and online to obtain a representative, cross-sectional sample of non-institutionalized adults, aged 18 years or older. Excluding non-gamblers, the remaining 2146 participants, included in these analyses, indicated they had either played DFS (n = 299) or had gambled but not played DFS (1847) in the past year. Univariate comparisons and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to identify the most significant characteristics and predictors of DFS players. Overall, a higher number of gambling activities, high frequency gambling, male gender, and reports of suicidal thoughts in the past year were most predictive of DFS players. Being Hispanic (vs. Caucasian) and/or single (vs. married or living with a partner) also doubled the odds of DFS play. Findings suggest that DFS players are characterized by high gambling frequency and problem severity and comorbid problems, notably suicidal ideation. Future research should examine the motivations and possible etiological sub-types of DFS players and the nature and course of DFS play, particularly in relation to gambling behavior and the development of gambling and other problems.
馃摉 Papers frequently viewed together
References10
Newest
#1Andrew C. Billings (UA: University of Alabama)H-Index: 33
#2Brody J. Ruihley (UC: University of Cincinnati)H-Index: 4
Last. Yiyi Yang (UA: University of Alabama)H-Index: 5
view all 3 authors...
The fantasy sport industry has grown rapidly in the past decade, now boasting 56 million participants in North America alone. More recently, the ascent of fantasy sport appears directly attributabl...
Source
Participation in fantasy sports has become increasingly popular. Typical gambling activities such as poker, sports wagering and, sports lotteries, share many similar characteristics with fantasy sports playing. Research has shown that not only are college students more likely to partake in risky behaviors (gambling, alcohol and drug use), but those who partake in fantasy sports are also more likely to experience gambling-related problems. However, no published studies have examined the relations...
Source
#1Dylan Pickering (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 7
#2Alex Blaszczynski (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 75
Last. Brittany Keen (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 4
view all 4 authors...
The emergence of daily fantasy sports has generated significant debate as to whether it constitutes gambling. Under current US law, States variably determine the legality of daily fantasy sports on the basis of it being a skill-based competition (legal) or a form of gambling where chance plays a major role (illegal). Accordingly, inconsistent State legislations are partly accounted for by differences in the degree to which legislators believe the activity is a game of skill or luck. In the absen...
Source
#1Ryan J. Martin (ECU: East Carolina University)H-Index: 12
#2Sarah E. Nelson (Harvard University)H-Index: 31
Last. Andrew R. Gallucci (Baylor University)H-Index: 8
view all 3 authors...
College students experience higher rates of gambling-related problems than most other population segments, including the general population. Although Division I (D1) athletes often have more at stake than the average student if and when they gamble (e.g., the potential to lose their athletic eligibility), relatively few studies have assessed the gambling behavior of this population and none have specifically assessed fantasy sports gambling. We conducted a study to examine gambling behavior (pas...
Source
#1Ryan J. Martin (ECU: East Carolina University)H-Index: 12
#2Sarah E. Nelson (CHA: Cambridge Health Alliance)H-Index: 31
Abstract Participation in fantasy sports increases annually. Wagering on fantasy sports is a form of gambling and researchers have found that fantasy sports participants are more likely to engage in other forms of sports betting than non-fantasy players; however, no published studies have examined whether there is a relationship between fantasy sports participation and gambling-related problems. Our study examined whether fantasy sports participation is associated with gambling-related problems ...
Source
#1Brian M. Mills (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 10
#2Dae Hee Kwak (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 16
Last. Woo Young Lee (UCM: University of Central Missouri)H-Index: 5
view all 4 authors...
Despite its explosive growth in North America, relatively little research has been conducted on the gambling implications of fantasy sports. The current study examines whether financial information (i.e. entry fee and payout) in an advertisement promoting a fantasy football service influences perceptions about opponents' perceived skill level and expected outcomes. This study also examines the impact of perceived opponents' skill and perceived winning expectations on the desire to participate in...
Source
#1Joris Drayer (TU: Temple University)H-Index: 16
#2Brendan Dwyer (VCU: Virginia Commonwealth University)H-Index: 12
Last. Stephen L. Shapiro (ODU: Old Dominion University)H-Index: 15
view all 3 authors...
Abstract After American legislators explicitly exempted fantasy sports from online gambling laws, legal theorists have debated whether or not playing fantasy sports for money warranted such an exemption. However, there is currently no survey-based research which has examined the relationship between gambling and the attitudes and behaviours of fantasy players. The current study surveyed 253 fantasy participants and separated respondents into groups based on whether or not they play fantasy baseb...
Source
Fantasy sport joins competition, sport knowledge, and socialization into one interactive sport activity. This research specifically focuses on the socialization aspects of the activity. This analysis addresses overall satisfaction in fantasy sport, future intentions to return to the activity, and reasons why fantasy sport users (FSUs) do or do not use message boards. Data were collected from 322 FSUs in a questionnaire format using quantitative-scale items and qualitative open-ended questions. T...
Source
#1Felicity Lorains (Monash University)H-Index: 6
#2Sean Cowlishaw (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 23
Last. Shane Thomas (Monash University)H-Index: 32
view all 3 authors...
This paper reviews evidence pertaining to the prevalence of common comorbid disorders, including alcohol use disorder, depression, substance use disorders, nicotine dependence, anxiety disorders and antisocial personality disorder, in population-representative samples of problem and pathological gamblers.
Source
#1Alex Blaszczynski (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 75
#2Lia Nower (UMSL: University of Missouri鈥揝t. Louis)H-Index: 24
ABSTRACT At the moment, there is no single conceptual theoretical model of gambling that adequately accounts for the multiple biological, psychological and ecological variables contributing to the development of pathological gambling. Advances in this area are hampered by imprecise definitions of pathological gambling, failure to distinguish between gambling problems and problem gamblers and a tendency to assume that pathological gamblers form one, homogeneous population with similar psychologic...
Source
Cited By10
Newest
#1Luke Wilkins (NTU: Nottingham Trent University)
#2Ross Dowsett (NTU: Nottingham Trent University)
Last. Peter M. Allen (ARU: Anglia Ruskin University)H-Index: 19
view all 5 authors...
Source
#1Brody J. Ruihley (Miami University)H-Index: 4
#2Andrew C. Billings (UA: University of Alabama)H-Index: 33
Last. Nick Buzzelli (UA: University of Alabama)
view all 3 authors...
The fantasy sport industry has seen tremendous changes in the past five years, thanks in large part to increased participation, media acceptance, easing of legal pressure, and the proliferation of ...
Source
#1Heather Wardle (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 22
Source
#1Matthew A. Tom (CHA: Cambridge Health Alliance)H-Index: 5
#2Pat M. Williams (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
Last. Debi A. LaPlante (CHA: Cambridge Health Alliance)H-Index: 29
view all 4 authors...
In daily fantasy sports (DFS) contests, participants form a roster of athletes scheduled to perform in a pre-determined list of sporting contests or games. Each participant has the opportunity to win cash prizes, depending on the performance of the athletes on their roster and the performances of the athletes on the other participants鈥 rosters. Some contests have higher variances than others (i.e., lower percentages of participants winning and higher payouts versus higher percentages of particip...
Source
#1Wonseok (Eric) Jang (SKKU: Sungkyunkwan University)H-Index: 10
#2Dae Hee Kwak (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 16
Last. Yong Jae Ko (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 29
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTResearch questions: Using an experimental design, this study simulated a drafting task to examine whether a user鈥檚 involvement with fantasy sports (FS), different types of goal-framing, and competitiveness trait determine his/her amount of energy and performance in the subsequent self-control behavior after completing the drafting task.Research method: Two experiments were employed, and participants (n鈥=鈥341) completed a Fantasy Sports Draft Task (FSD-T) that was developed for this study...
Source
Source
#1Timothy C. Edson (CHA: Cambridge Health Alliance)H-Index: 2
#2Debi A. LaPlante (CHA: Cambridge Health Alliance)H-Index: 29
Abstract Research suggests that populations of gamblers can adapt rapidly to online sports betting services after subscribing. This pattern of adaptation typically shows an initial play increase followed by a sharp overall betting (e.g., amount wagered and number of bets) decline. Such trends are consistent with models of exposure and adaptation. Although exposure and adaptation effects are observable in a variety of situations, currently we know very little about whether these trends are eviden...
Source
#1Sharon Lawn (Flinders University)H-Index: 27
#2Candice Oster (Flinders University)H-Index: 19
Last. Mubarak A R Rahamathulla (Flinders University)H-Index: 2
view all 6 authors...
There have been significant changes in the gambling landscape particularly relating to gambling in the digital age. As the gambling landscape changes, regulation of gambling also needs to change. In 2018, the Office of Responsible Gambling in New South Wales, Australia, commissioned a gap analysis to inform their research objectives and priority focus areas. This included an identification of gaps in our understanding of emerging technologies and new trends in gambling. A gap analysis of the pee...
Source
#1Ken C. Winters (Oregon Research Institute)H-Index: 61
#2Jeffrey L. Derevensky (McGill University)H-Index: 61
Given significant technological advances, the U.S. Supreme Court ruling in 2018 permitting U.S. states to offer and regulate sports wagering, and multiple international governments already regulating and licensing sports wagering operators, sports wagering will likely continue to grow exponentially. This expanding landscape of sports wagering may pose public health problems. This literature review provides a description of our current knowledge of sports gambling behaviour among adults, adolesce...
Source
#1Jeffrey L. Derevensky (McGill University)H-Index: 61
#2David R. McDuff (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 17
Last. J茅r茅mie Richard (McGill University)H-Index: 5
view all 6 authors...
Opportunities to participate in gambling have dramatically changed during the past 20 years. Casinos have proliferated as have electronic gambling machines, lotteries, sports betting, and most recently online gambling. Gambling among the general population has moved from being perceived negatively to a socially acceptable pastime. As over 80% of individuals have reported gambling for money during their lifetime, governments recognise that regulating gambling鈥攁 multibillion dollar industry鈥攊s a s...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.