Individual differences in masculine honor beliefs predict attitudes toward aggressive security measures, war, and peace

Published on Feb 1, 2018in Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology
· DOI :10.1037/PAC0000303
Donald A. Saucier20
Estimated H-index: 20
(KSU: Kansas State University),
Russell J. Webster10
Estimated H-index: 10
+ 3 AuthorsMegan L. Strain8
Estimated H-index: 8
(NU: University of Nebraska–Lincoln)
Source
Abstract
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
29 Citations
19 Citations
29 Citations
References0
Newest
Cited By14
Newest
#1Jarrod E. Bock (TU: Towson University)H-Index: 1
#2Raymond P. Tucker (LSU: Louisiana State University)H-Index: 19
Last. Michael D. Anestis (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 46
view all 8 authors...
OBJECTIVE White men in U.S. cultures of honor die by suicide at greater rates than other demographic groups. This finding has been attributed to factors such as the prevalence and use of firearms in men's suicide in honor states, as well as motivational risk factors (e.g., thwarted belongingness). Other features of honor cultures (e.g., physical aggression, risk-taking behaviors) suggest that honor-endorsing men may frequently experience painful and provocative events (PPEs), which, in turn, may...
Source
#1Russell J. Webster (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
#2Nicolette (Lynn) Morrone (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 1
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Even if businesses try to be ethical, they can succeed only if there are ethically-minded consumers. Three studies using college (N = 199) and nationwide (Ns = 345 and 327) convenience samples examined the effects of belief in pure evil (BPE) and belief in pure good (BPG) on consumer ethics attitudes and behavior, after controlling for demographic variables and various moral attitude scales. Across S1 and S2, BPG uniquely predicted greater endorsement of more prosocial consumer actions ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Russell J. Webster (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 10
#2Dominic Vasturia (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 2
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
2 CitationsSource
Abstract People differ greatly in their beliefs in pure good (BPG) and beliefs in pure evil (BPE), but little is known about how people develop such beliefs. In two studies using nationwide convenience samples (Ns = 384 and 345), we used trait (Big 5; HEXACO) and moral (moral foundations theory; Kohlberg's theory of moral development) theories to uncover potential underpinnings of BPG and BPE. After controlling for demographics and ideology, traits (Agreeableness) and moral foundations (Care/Har...
Source
#1Maria-Jose Sanchez-Ruiz (Lebanese American University)H-Index: 11
#2Perla El Ahmad (Lebanese American University)
Last. Marie Adele Saliba (Lebanese American University)
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The acceptance of rape myths persists at varying levels across societies, which creates a hostile environment in which rape is justified and victims are blamed for being assaulted. This study investigated experience and familiarity with sexual assault, the Dark Triad traits, and gender-based beliefs benevolent and hostile sexism, and masculine honor beliefs as predictors of rape myth acceptance in a Lebanese sample consisting of 311 participants (177 women). Men scored significantly hig...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ashley A. Schiffer (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 1
#2Conor J. O'Dea (Union College)H-Index: 8
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Given that individual differences influence virus-mitigating behaviors and the COVID-19 pandemic posed new moral dilemmas for individuals to resolve, across three studies (N = 704), we assessed how masculine honor beliefs (MHB), beliefs in pure good (BPG), evil (BPE), and the dark triad (DT) influence COVID-19 moral decision-making. Specifically, we analyzed moral decision-making at the microlevel (i.e., individual- and familial-level; Study 1), in decisions with (hypothetical) life-or-death con...
3 CitationsSource
#1Evelyn Stratmoen (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
#2Emilio D. Rivera (UW: University of Wyoming)
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
We examined the relationships between masculine honor beliefs (MHB) and women’s endorsement of various rejection-related behaviors, as well as both men’s and women’s perceptions of men’s aggressive...
Source
#1Evelyn Stratmoen (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
#2Tiffany J. Lawless (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 2
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
Abstract We examined the influence of individual differences in the propensity to make attributions to prejudice (PMAP) and adherence to masculine honor beliefs (MHBs) on perceptions of NFL players who protested during the National Anthem. Those higher in adherence to MHBs perceived protests as inappropriate, and a Black player as more disrespectful when he took a knee, while those higher in PMAP perceived protests as appropriate, and a White player as more disrespectful when he stood. Additiona...
6 CitationsSource
#1Conor J. O'Dea (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 8
#2Amanda L. Martens (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 5
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
: We examined the effect of masculine honor beliefs on perceptions of unfair fighting behavior. We proposed competing hypotheses about the nature of this relationship. Our Reputation by Any Means Hypothesis predicted masculine honor beliefs would be positively related to perceptions of unfair fighting behavior as permissible because they increase the likelihood of success. Conversely, our Reputation by Honorable Means Hypothesis predicted masculine honor beliefs would be negatively related to pe...
4 CitationsSource
#1Amanda L. Martens (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 5
#2Evelyn Stratmoen (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 3
Last. Donald A. Saucier (KSU: Kansas State University)H-Index: 20
view all 3 authors...
AbstractWe investigated the relationship between masculine honor beliefs and perceptions of the candidates vying for the presidency. Consistent with hypotheses, we found that higher levels of masculine honor beliefs were associated with more positive perceptions of Donald Trump and with more negative perceptions of Hillary Clinton. Furthermore, our results indicate that higher levels of masculine honor beliefs were associated with clear preferences for Donald Trump. Thus, our data, collected imm...
3 CitationsSource