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#1Sam Lu (Children's Hospital Oakland)H-Index: 1
* null null Abbreviations: null null null ACSC — null null null null : null null ambulatory care sensitive condition null null null COI — null null null null : null null Child Opportunity Index In this issue of Pediatrics , Krager et al1 examine the relationship between hospitalizations due to ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) and the Child Opportunity Index (COI) 2.0. The concept of ACSCs was first set forth by Billings et al2 as a means of examining the potential impact of socioecon...
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#1Molly Krager (UMKC: University of Missouri–Kansas City)H-Index: 2
#2Henry T. Puls (UMKC: University of Missouri–Kansas City)H-Index: 5
Last. Andrew F. Beck (Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center)H-Index: 28
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BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES null Hospitalizations for ambulatory care sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are thought to be avoidable with high-quality outpatient care. Morbidity related to ACSCs has been associated with socioeconomic contextual factors, which do not necessarily capture the complex pathways through which a child9s environment impacts health outcomes. Our primary objective was to test the association between a multidimensional measure of neighborhood-level child opportunity and pediatric ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Alison CurfmanH-Index: 2
#2S. David McSwain (MUSC: Medical University of South Carolina)H-Index: 7
Last. Christina A Olson (University of Colorado Denver)H-Index: 2
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#1Rosalind B. King (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 19
#2Elizabeth Neilson (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 3
Last. Tracy M. King (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 1
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* null null Abbreviation: null null null NIH — null null null null : null null National Institutes of Health Collectively, through the articles in this supplement, the authors identify numerous challenges to advancing the science of childhood screening but also note exciting opportunities for future research, including potential advances in terminology, theoretical frameworks, and methodologic approaches. The authors’ contributions are grounded in the existing standards of pediatric research but...
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#1Asad BandealyH-Index: 1
#2Monika K. GoyalH-Index: 18
Last. Danielle G. DooleyH-Index: 2
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The recent spate of mass shootings across the United States has led the president to declare gun violence a public health epidemic.1 Among adolescents and young adults, suicide and homicide are the second- and third-leading causes of death, with approximately half of suicides and nearly 90% of homicides in this age group related to firearms.2–4 In this issue of Pediatrics , Copeland et al5 present the first published prospective study in which the impact of childhood firearm exposure on adult ou...
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#1Mary Jean Brown (Harvard University)H-Index: 29
#2Alex R. Kemper (Nationwide Children's Hospital)H-Index: 68
* null null Abbreviation: null null null CDC — null null null null : null null Centers for Disease Control and Prevention A core principle of screening is that there should be a direct benefit to the patient. This restriction undervalues the impact that screening could have by not considering the population-level benefits to others, including family members, close contacts of affected individuals, and the broader community. Screening for lead poisoning offers an example of how individual screeni...
1 CitationsSource
#1Ann Chen Wu (Harvard University)H-Index: 1
#2Corina Graif (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 12
Last. Kenneth D. Mandl (Harvard University)H-Index: 75
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Advances in new technologies, when incorporated into routine health screening, have tremendous promise to benefit children. The number of health screening tests, many of which have been developed with machine learning or genomics, has exploded. To assess efficacy of health screening, ideally, randomized trials of screening in youth would be conducted; however, these can take years to conduct and may not be feasible. Thus, innovative methods to evaluate the long-term outcomes of screening are nee...
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#1Diana W. Bianchi (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 88
#2David M. Murray (NIH: National Institutes of Health)H-Index: 99
* null null Abbreviation: null null null NIH — null null null null : null null National Institutes of Health The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has a special interest group on childhood screening that is staffed jointly by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the Office of Disease Prevention in the Office of the NIH Director. After a series of internal meetings, the special interest group decided that the most compelling issue to tackle was...
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#1Corina Graif (PSU: Pennsylvania State University)H-Index: 12
#2John R. Meurer (MCW: Medical College of Wisconsin)H-Index: 17
Last. Margherita Fontana (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 35
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* null null Abbreviation: null null null FV — null null null null : null null fluoride varnish Screening and surveillance are integral aspects of child health promotion and disease prevention. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that primary care clinicians screen children and adolescents for a broad array of conditions, conduct surveillance of growth and development, and identify social determinants of health and protective and risk factors that might impact health over time. However,...
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#1Scott D. Grosse (CDC: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)H-Index: 71
#2Alex R. Kemper (Nationwide Children's Hospital)H-Index: 68
Last. Lisa A. ProsserH-Index: 42
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* null null Abbreviations: null null null CEA — null null null null : null null cost-effectiveness analysis null null null NTD — null null null null : null null neural tube defect null null null QALY — null null null null : null null quality-adjusted life-year Although cost-effectiveness analyses could inform recommendations regarding preventive services in primary care, valid assessments are rarely conducted for policy makers in the United States, other than for immunizations. Assuming policy m...
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