Michael I. Norton
Harvard University
Public economicsAdvertisingFeelingBusinessLabour economicsPsychologyProsocial behaviorEconomicsMarketingCognitionPolitical scienceCognitive psychologyConsumer behaviourPerceptionWell-beingValue (ethics)HappinessDemographic economicsInequalityRace (biology)Social psychology
356Publications
71H-index
12.3kCitations
Publications 320
Newest
Abstract null null The many benefits of finding meaning in work suggest the importance of identifying activities that increase job meaningfulness. The current paper identifies one such activity: engaging in rituals with workgroups. Five studies (N = 1,099) provide evidence that performing group rituals can enhance the meaningfulness of work, and that in turn this meaning can enhance organizational citizenship behaviors (to the benefit of those groups). We first define group rituals both conceptu...
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#1Ximena Garcia-Rada (A&M: Texas A&M University)H-Index: 6
#2Mary Steffel (NU: Northeastern University)H-Index: 9
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
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#1Grant E. Donnelly (OSU: Ohio State University)
#1Grant E. Donnelly (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
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#1Daniel H. Stein (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 2
#2Juliana Schroeder (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 12
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
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From Catholics performing the sign of the cross since the 4th century to Americans reciting the Pledge of Allegiance since the 1890s, group rituals (i.e., predefined sequences of symbolic actions) have strikingly consistent features over time. Seven studies (N = 4,213) document the sacrosanct nature of rituals: Because group rituals symbolize sacred group values, even minor alterations to them provoke moral outrage and punishment. In Pilot Studies A and B, fraternity members who failed to comple...
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#1Tobias Schlager (UNIL: University of Lausanne)H-Index: 8
#2Bhavya Mohan (USF: University of San Francisco)H-Index: 5
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
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#1Grant E. Donnelly (OSU: Ohio State University)H-Index: 7
#2Cait Lamberton (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 18
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
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Many consumers struggle to repay their credit card debt, in part because paying small portions of large bills often feels fruitless. We introduce a novel credit card payment option – repayment-by-purchase – and examine its influence on both the amount consumers’ repay and their perception of progress toward reducing their debt. With typical repayment, consumers simply enter the amount they wish to pay toward their total balance – often the minimum required payment. With repayment-by-purchase, in...
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#1George WardH-Index: 7
#2Hanne K. CollinsH-Index: 3
Last. Ashley V. WhillansH-Index: 10
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#1Mohan, Bhavya, Hagerty, Serena, Norton, Michael I. (USF: University of San Francisco)
#1Bhavya MohanH-Index: 5
Last. Michael I. NortonH-Index: 71
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Two experiments, including one incentive compatible study, examine the impact of cutting pay for executives versus employees in response to COVID-19 on consumer behavior. Study 1 explores the effect of announcing cuts or no cuts to CEO and employee pay, and shows that firms’ commitment to paying employees their full wages leads to the most positive consumer reactions. Study 2 further examines the effects of announcing employee and CEO pay cuts: though announcing CEO pay cuts in tandem with emplo...
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#1Yei Rim Suh (BU: Boston University)
#2Evan P. Apfelbaum (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 16
Last. Michael I. Norton (Harvard University)H-Index: 71
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The 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act intensified debates over the role of government in the distribution of healthcare. A nationally-representative sample of Americans reported their estimated and ideal distributions of healthcare (unmet need for prescription medications) and death (gains in life expectancy). Respondents across the demographic and political spectrum wanted mortality and healthcare to be distributed more evenly among the rich and poor than they estimated them to be...
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