David G. Rand
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Prisoner's dilemmaIntuitionPsychologyProsocial behaviorPublic goodEconomicsCognitionMicroeconomicsGame theoryCognitive psychologyEvolutionary game theoryRepeated gameDeliberationMisinformationDilemmaSelfishnessPunishment (psychology)Computer scienceSocial mediaDictator gamePublic goods gameSocial psychology
363Publications
68H-index
16.1kCitations
Publications 278
Newest
#1Alexander J. Stewart (St And: University of St Andrews)H-Index: 13
#2Antonio A. ArecharH-Index: 8
Last. Joshua B. PlotkinH-Index: 59
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The spread of misinformation and "fake news" continues to be a major focus of public concern. A great deal of recent research has examined who falls for misinformation and why, and what can be done to make people more discerning consumers of news. Comparatively little work, however, has considered the choices of those who produce misinformation, and how these choices interact with the psychology of news consumers. Here we use game-theoretic models to study the strategic interaction between news ...
#2James Chu (Columbia University)
Last. Robb WillerH-Index: 32
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3 CitationsSource
#1Leah R. Rosenzweig (Stanford University)H-Index: 2
#2Bence BagoH-Index: 10
Last. David G. RandH-Index: 68
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1 CitationsSource
#1Paul A. M. Van Lange (VU: VU University Amsterdam)H-Index: 68
#2David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 68
Contemporary society is facing many social dilemmas-including climate change, COVID-19, and misinformation-characterized by a conflict between short-term self-interest and longer-term collective interest. The climate crisis requires paying costs today to benefit distant others (and oneself) in the future. The COVID-19 crisis requires the less vulnerable to pay costs to benefit the more vulnerable in the face of great uncertainty. The misinformation crisis requires investing effort to assess trut...
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The spread of misinformation and "fake news" continues to be a major focus of public concern. A great deal of research has examined who falls for misinformation and why, and what can be done to make people more discerning consumers of news. Comparatively little work, however, has considered the choices of those who produce misinformation, and how these choices interact with the psychology of news consumers. Here we use game-theoretic models to study the strategic interaction between news publish...
#1Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 40
#2David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 68
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#1Oliver P. HauserH-Index: 12
Last. Michael I. NortonH-Index: 71
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Four experiments examine how lack of awareness of inequality affect behaviour towards the rich and poor. In Experiment 1, participants who became aware that wealthy individuals donated a smaller percentage of their income switched from rewarding the wealthy to rewarding the poor. In Experiments 2 and 3, participants who played a public goods game – and were assigned incomes reflective of the US income distribution either at random or on merit – punished the poor (for small absolute contributions...
11 CitationsSource
#1Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 40
#2Jonathon McPhetres (Durham University)H-Index: 8
Last. David G. Rand (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 68
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What are the psychological consequences of the increasingly politicized nature of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States relative to similar Western countries? In a two-wave study completed early (March) and later (December) in the pandemic, we found that polarization was greater in the United States (N = 1,339) than in Canada (N = 644) and the United Kingdom. (N = 1,283). Political conservatism in the United States was strongly associated with engaging in weaker mitigation behaviors, lower ...
5 CitationsSource
#1Gordon PennycookH-Index: 40
#2David G. RandH-Index: 68
A major focus of current research is understanding why people fall for and share fake news on social media. While much research focuses on understanding the role of personality-level traits for those who share the news, such as partisanship and analytic thinking, characteristics of the articles themselves have not been studied. Across two pre-registered studies, we examined whether character-deprecation headlines - headlines designed to deprecate someone's character, but which have no impact on ...
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