Population change and rural society

Published on Jan 1, 2006
· DOI :10.1007/1-4020-3902-6
William A. Kandel6
Estimated H-index: 6
,
David L. Brown33
Estimated H-index: 33
Sources
Abstract
Contributors.- Acknowledgments.- Foreword, Calvin Beale.- Part I: Introduction and Demographic Context.- 1. Rural America Through a Demographic Lens, David L. Brown and William Kandel.- 2. The Rural Rebound and Its Aftermath: Changing Demographic Dynamics and Regional Contrasts, Kenneth M. Johnson and John B. Cromartie.- Part II: Four Critical Socio-demographic Themes.- 3. Changing Faces of Rural America, Annabel Kirschner, E. Helen Berry and Nina Glasgow.- 4. Changing Livelihoods in Rural America, Alex Vias and Peter Nelson.- 5. Fifty Years of Farmland Change: Urbanization, Population Growth and the Changing Farm Economy, Max J. Pfeffer, Joe D. Francis and Zev Ross.- 6. Changing Fortunes: Poverty in Rural America, Leif Jensen, Stephan J. Goetz and Hema Swaminathan.- Part III: Case Studies of Population and Society in Different Rural Regions.- Population Composition.- 7. Hispanic Population Growth, Age Composition Shifts, and Public Policy Impacts in Nonmetro Counties, William Kandel and Emilio Parrado.- 8. Social Integration of Older Inmigrants in Nonmetro Retirement Destination Counties, Nina Glasgow and David L. Brown.- Livelihoods.- 9. Agricultural Dependence and Population Change in the Great Plains, Kenneth M. Johnson and Richard W. Rathge.- 10. Gaming, Population Change and Rural Development on Indian Reservations: An Idaho Case Study, Gundars Rudzitis.- 11. Urban Sprawl and Rural Economic Transformation in the South, John B. Cromartie.- Land Use.- 12. Changing Land Use Patterns in the Rocky Mountain West, Doug Jackson Smith, Eric Jensen and Brian Jennings.- 13. The Effect of Seasonal Homes on Indicators of Rurality, Richard C. Stedman, Stephan Goetz and Benjamin S. Weagraff.- 14. Housing Affordability in the North Woods of Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan, Roger B. Hammer and Richelle Winkler.- Emerging Opportunity and Chronic Disadvantage.- 15. Social Change and Well Being in Western Amenity-Growth Communities, Richard S. Krannich, Peggy Petrzelka andJoan Brehm.- 16. Community Evaluation and Migration Intentions: The Role of Attraction and Aversion to Place on the Northern Great Plains, Christiane von Reichert.- 17. Persistent Poverty and Inequality in Appalachia, Elgin Mannion and Dwight B. Billings.- 18. Welfare Reform Amidst Chronic Poverty in the Mississippi Delta, M. A. Lee and Joachim Singelmann.- Part IV: New Analytic Directions and Policy Implications.- 19. The (Re-)Emergence of Spatial Demography, Paul R. Voss, Katherine J. Curtis White and Roger B. Hammer.- 20. Policy Implications of Rural Demographic Change, Leslie Whitener.- Index.
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
References228
Newest
#1Peter B. Nelson (Middlebury College)H-Index: 16
#2James P. Nicholson (Middlebury College)H-Index: 1
Last. E. Hope Stege (Middlebury College)H-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Both economic and demographic contexts influence aggregate migration streams at the regional scale. The influence of demographic and economic context on aggregate migration at the nonmetropolitan scale, however, remains unstudied. This paper presents analysis based on 1980 and 1990 Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) data related to age cohort effects on nonmetropolitan population change. The analysis provides enhanced understanding of how demographic factors like the baby boom might influence po...
Source
Source
#1Nina GlasgowH-Index: 17
#2Nan E. JohnsonH-Index: 1
Last. Lois Wright MortonH-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Foreword.Preface.1. Introduction. (Nina Glasgow, Nan E. Johnson, and Lois Wright Morton).Part I. Rural Morbidity, Disability, and Mortality.2. Rural/Urban Contrast in Population Morbidity Status. (Robert B. Wallace, Ligia A. Grindeanu, and Dominic J. Cirillo).3. Spatial Patterning of Disabilities among Adults. (Nan E. Johnson).4. Spatial Patterns of Rural Mortality. (Lois Wright Morton).Part II. Challenges to a Healthy Rural America.5. Health Hazards of Rural Extractive Industries and Occupation...
#1Kenneth M. JohnsonH-Index: 1
#1Audrey SingerH-Index: 9
■ The U.S. foreign-born population grew 57.4 percent in the 1990s; by 2000 nearly onethird of U.S. immigrants resided outside established settlement states. Thirteen states primarily in the West and Southeast—including many that had not previously been major destinations for immigrants—saw foreign-born growth rates more than double the national average. These states included, Colorado, Georgia, Nevada, and North Carolina. ■ Historical settlement patterns along with recent influxes of immigrants ...
Source
This paper analyzes in three contexts the effects of changing economic conditions and varying economic perspectives on the way land is considered in economic doctrine. The first considers agricultural land use where agriculture is connected to the rest of the economy exclusively through input and commodity markets, and when all other parts of the economy are assumed to remain constant. The second connects agriculture to the remainder of the economy by virtue of a shared natural environment, faci...
Source
Source
Cited By84
Newest
The rural United States is sometimes viewed as a paragon of stability, but demographic change has been a constant. Rural and small-town America is diverse, dynamic, and relational to (rather than separate from) urban places. Dominant demographic trends in the rural U.S. over recent decades include depopulation (driven by population aging and youth out-migration), increasing ethnoracial diversity (especially as linked to Hispanic population growth), and in-migration to select areas associated wit...
Source
#1César J. Ayala (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 6
#2Laird W. Bergad (CUNY: City University of New York)H-Index: 5
Fundamental tenets of colonial historiography are challenged by showing that US capital investment into this colony did not lead to the disappearance of the small farmer. Contrary to well-established narratives, quantitative data show that the increasing integration of rural producers within the US market led to differential outcomes, depending on pre-existing land tenure structures, capital requirements to initiate production, and demographics. These new data suggest that the colonial economy w...
#2Laird W. Bergad (CUNY: City University of New York)H-Index: 5
Source
#1César J. Ayala (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 6
#2Laird W. Bergad (CUNY: City University of New York)H-Index: 5
Source
#1César J. Ayala (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 6
#2Laird W. Bergad (CUNY: City University of New York)H-Index: 5
Source
#1César J. Ayala (UCLA: University of California, Los Angeles)H-Index: 6
#2Laird W. Bergad (CUNY: City University of New York)H-Index: 5
Source
#2Laird W. Bergad (CUNY: City University of New York)H-Index: 5
Source
يرتبط الاسكان الميسر بتوفير السكن اللائق للاسر ذات الدخول المتوسطة والواطئة . عرف البحث الاسكان الميسر اجرائيا بأنه الاسكان الذي يلبي حاجات مدى من الدخول التي تتدرج من المتوسطة الى الواطئة والتي تكون دخولها بحدود (60%-80%) من متوسط الدخول لمنطقة معينة بحيث لا تتجاوز كلف الاسكان(30%) من الدخل السنوي للأسر(ايجارا او امتلاكا) . اما النمو الذكي فهو تنمية تتضمن مجموعة من المبادئ لحل مشاكل الانتشار الحضري للوصول الى أحياء سكنية متضامة داعمة للأسكان الميسر و تعدد خيارات الاسكان و تحقق الجوانب البيئية و...
Source
#1Breanne Pleggenkuhle (SIU: Southern Illinois University Carbondale)H-Index: 7
#2Joseph A. Schafer (SIU: Southern Illinois University Carbondale)H-Index: 20
AbstractResearch often overlooks rural populations in explaining criminal justice phenomena, despite variant social and economic patterns. The current study considers fear of crime among rural residents, particularly as it relates with social experiences, prior victimization, and respondent characteristics. In particular, gender is considered not only as a covariate but the unique patterns of fear of crime in comparing male and female models. Using survey data from a nationally representative sa...
Source
#1Thomas S. Gruca (UI: University of Iowa)H-Index: 25
#2Tae-Hyung Pyo (SUNY: State University of New York System)H-Index: 2
Last. Gregory C. Nelson (Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine)H-Index: 3
view all 3 authors...
Background Workforce experts predict a future shortage of cardiologists that is expected to impact rural areas more severely than urban areas. However, there is little research on how rural patients are currently served through clinical outreach. This study examines the impact of cardiology outreach in Iowa, a state with a large rural population, on participating cardiologists and on patient access. Methods and Results Outreach clinics are tracked annually in the Office of Statewide Clinical Edu...
Source
This website uses cookies.
We use cookies to improve your online experience. By continuing to use our website we assume you agree to the placement of these cookies.
To learn more, you can find in our Privacy Policy.