Sex differences in seizure effects on social anxiety in persons with epilepsy.

Published on Nov 1, 2021in Epilepsy & Behavior2.937
· DOI :10.1016/J.YEBEH.2021.108318
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Abstract
PURPOSE We investigated sex differences in the effect of seizures on social anxiety in persons with epilepsy. METHOD In this cross-sectional multicenter study, social anxiety was measured using the short forms of the Social Phobia Scale (SPS-6) and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS-6). SPS-6 scores ≥ 9 and SIAS-6 scores ≥ 12 were considered to indicate social phobia and social interaction anxiety, respectively. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Stigma Scale-Revised, and Family Adaptation-Partnership-Growth-Affection-Resolve scale were also completed. A logistic regression analysis with an interaction term was used to analyze the data. RESULTS Out of 285 participants, a SPS-6 score ≥ 9 and a SIAS-6 score ≥ 12 were noted in 62 (21.8%) and 36 (12.6%) of participants, respectively. There was no difference in the prevalence of social anxiety between men and women. Intractable seizures and lack of seizure freedom were associated with a SPS-6 score ≥ 9 and a SIAS-6 score ≥ 12, but statistical significance was lost in the adjusted models. However, intractable seizures and lack of seizure freedom significantly interacted with sex for a SPS-6 score ≥ 9 (p = 0.018) and a SIAS-6 score ≥ 12 (p = 0.048) in both the separate and adjusted models. Specifically, intractable seizures tended to be positively associated with SPS-6 scores ≥ 9 than non-intractable seizures in men only (odds ratio = 2.602, p = 0.068), whereas lack of seizure freedom tended to be negatively associated with SIAS-6 scores ≥ 12 than seizure freedom in women only (odds ratio = 4.804, p = 0.053). CONCLUSION We found significant sex differences in seizure effects on social anxiety. Intractable seizures were associated with social phobia in men, whereas lack of seizure freedom in the last year was associated with social interaction anxiety in women.
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#1Sang-Ahm Lee (UOU: University of Ulsan)H-Index: 27
#2Soo Jeong Kim (UOU: University of Ulsan)H-Index: 11
Last. Ok-Joon KimH-Index: 24
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Purpose The aim of this study was to determine whether gender influences the prediction of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in persons with newly diagnosed epilepsy (NDE). Methods This was a 1-year longitudinal study. Persons with NDE were assessed with the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-31 (QOLIE-31), the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS), the Stigma Scale, and the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with interaction terms was used. Resul...
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#1Yingxue Lu (JLU: Jilin University)H-Index: 3
#2Rui Zhong (JLU: Jilin University)H-Index: 5
Last. Weihong Lin (JLU: Jilin University)H-Index: 4
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Objective This study aimed to investigate the factors influencing the level of social anxiety in patients with epilepsy (PWE) in Northeast China. We also identified the effect of social anxiety on the quality of life in these patients. Methods A consecutive cohort of 148 adult PWE from The First Hospital of Jilin University were recruited. In this sample, 116 patients had focal epilepsy, 20 had generalized epilepsy, and 12 had unclassified epilepsy. Depressive symptoms, social anxiety, ...
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#1Rui Zhong (JLU: Jilin University)H-Index: 5
#2Qingling Chen (Tianjin Medical University)H-Index: 3
Last. Weihong Lin (JLU: Jilin University)H-Index: 4
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Objectives Evidence has indicated that there may be sex differences in the prevalence of and risk factors for anxiety in patients with epilepsy (PWE). The prevalence and risk factors for anxiety in male and female PWE in Northeast China were investigated. Methods A consecutive cohort of patients with epilepsy (PWE) from the First Hospital of Jilin University was recruited. Anxiety symptoms were assessed using the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire (GAD-7; Chinese versio...
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#1Sang-Ahm Lee (UOU: University of Ulsan)H-Index: 27
#2Soo Jeong Kim (UOU: University of Ulsan)H-Index: 11
Last. Young-Joo No (UOU: University of Ulsan)H-Index: 5
view all 5 authors...
Abstract Purpose We determined whether resilience factors such as self-efficacy, stress coping styles, and social support were differentially associated with health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in men and women with epilepsy after controlling for depression, anxiety, and daily-life stress. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 129 adults with epilepsy. The Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory-31 (QOLIE-31), Epilepsy Self-Efficacy Scale, Way of Stress Coping Checklist, Social Support Sc...
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#1Zhao LiuH-Index: 1
#2Rong YinH-Index: 1
Last. Fang KuangH-Index: 15
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Purpose: Comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders in people with epilepsy (PWE) are highly prevalent and associated with low quality of life (QOL) and may even lead to poor outcomes of epilepsy. Among the various factors that affect these negative emotional comorbidities, possible gender differences remain poorly understood and are often neglected. This research aimed to determine whether there are discrepancies in the prevalence and moderating factors of anxiety and depression between men and ...
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#1Wenjuan Gao (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 2
#2Siqing PingH-Index: 2
Last. Xinqiao Liu (PKU: Peking University)H-Index: 2
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Abstract Background The objective of this longitudinal study was to examine the gender differences in college students' depression, anxiety, and stress over the four academic years, and to explore possible anxiety-related factors among first year students. Methods The study analyzed 1892 undergraduate students from 15 universities in China, with 898 females and 994 males. The students have been followed for four years and completed a survey containing the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 quest...
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#1Su-Hyun Han (CAU: Chung-Ang University)H-Index: 10
#2Keun Tae Kim (KMU: Keimyung University)H-Index: 8
Last. Jong-Geun Seo (KNU: Kyungpook National University)H-Index: 12
view all 15 authors...
Abstract Purpose The aim of this study was to examine social anxiety in South Korean adults with epilepsy and to identify associated factors. Method This was a cross-sectional, multicenter study in South Korea. Social anxiety was assessed using short forms of the Social Phobia Scale (SPS-6) and Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS-6). The SPS-6 scores ≥ 9 and SIAS-6 scores ≥ 12 were considered indicative of social phobia and social interaction anxiety, respectively. The Patient Health Question...
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#1Baibing Chen (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 2
#2Hyunmi Choi (Comprehensive Epilepsy Center)H-Index: 20
Last. Kamil Detyniecki (Comprehensive Epilepsy Center)H-Index: 17
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Abstract Purpose Psychiatric and behavioral side effects (PBSEs) are common, undesirable effects associated with antiepileptic drug (AED) use. The objective of the study was to compare the PBSE profiles of older and newer AEDs in a large specialty practice-based sample of patients diagnosed with epilepsy. Methods As part of the Columbia and Yale AED Database Project, we reviewed patient records including demographics, medical history, AED use, and side effects for 4085 adult patients (age: 18 ye...
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#1Falk Leichsenring (University of Giessen)H-Index: 52
#2Frank Leweke (University of Giessen)H-Index: 16
Key Clinical PointsSocial Anxiety Disorder Social anxiety disorder affects up to 13% of the U.S. population and is characterized by an intense fear of social situations in which the person anticipates being evaluated negatively. Social anxiety is associated with an increased risk of other mental disorders, such as depression and substance-use disorder. Patients frequently avoid consulting a physician for social anxiety disorder. A coexisting condition is often what leads people with social anxie...
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#1Amelia J. Scott (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 6
#2Louise Sharpe (USYD: University of Sydney)H-Index: 66
Last. Milena Gandy (Macquarie University)H-Index: 22
view all 4 authors...
SummaryObjective Comorbid anxiety and depressive disorders in people with epilepsy (PWE) are highly prevalent and associated with various adverse outcomes. However, the prevalence of anxiety disorders in PWE across studies is highly variable. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence and moderating factors of anxiety and depressive disorders in PWE. Methods Following prospective registration (PROSPERO; CRD42015027101), electronic databases were searched for studies that reported the prevalence of b...
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