Emoji as a tool to aid the comprehension of written sarcasm: Evidence from younger and older adults

Published on Jan 1, 2022in Computers in Human Behavior6.829
· DOI :10.1016/J.CHB.2021.106971
Charlotte Garcia (University of Nottingham), Alexandra Țurcan3
Estimated H-index: 3
(University of Nottingham)
+ 1 AuthorsRuth Filik23
Estimated H-index: 23
(University of Nottingham)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract null null There is evidence for an age-related decline in the ability to understand non-literal language such as sarcasm. There is also evidence to suggest that devices such as emoticons/emojis may influence sarcasm comprehension in younger adults. However, research examining whether such devices may improve written sarcasm comprehension in older adults is scarce. The present study used an online rating task to investigate the influence of the winking face emoji on both the interpretation and perception of message intent for sarcastic or literal criticism or praise. Results revealed that older adults, in comparison to their younger counterparts, demonstrated deficient ability in interpreting and perceiving sarcastic intent. However, older adults’ interpretation and perception of sarcastic intent were significantly improved when the messages were accompanied by the winking face emoji. This would suggest that the winking face emoji is a clear indicator of sarcastic intent, compensating for the absence of non-verbal cues in written communication, and may play a useful role in successful intergenerational communication.
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#1Hannah Howman (University of Nottingham)H-Index: 2
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#1Mahsa Barzy (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 4
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Typically developing (TD) adults are able to keep track of story characters’ emotional states online while reading. Filik et al. (2017) showed that initially, participants expected the victim to be more hurt by ironic comments than literal, but later considered them less hurtful; ironic comments were regarded as more amusing. We examined these processes in autistic adults, since previous research has demonstrated socio-emotional difficulties among autistic people, which may lead to problems proc...
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A growing body of research explores emoji, which are visual symbols in computer mediated communication (CMC). In the 20 years since the first set of emoji was released, research on it has been on the increase, albeit in a variety of directions. We reviewed the extant body of research on emoji and noted the development, usage, function, and application of emoji. In this review article, we provide a systematic review of the extant body of work on emoji, reviewing how they have developed, how they ...
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