Future trends in measuring physiology in free-living animals

Published on Aug 16, 2021in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B5.68
· DOI :10.1098/RSTB.2020.0230
H. J. Williams1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MPG: Max Planck Society),
H. J. Williams1
Estimated H-index: 1
(MPG: Max Planck Society)
+ 3 AuthorsLucy A. Hawkes24
Estimated H-index: 24
(University of Exeter)
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Abstract
Thus far, ecophysiology research has predominantly been conducted within controlled laboratory-based environments, owing to a mismatch between the recording technologies available for physiological...
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