Occurrence of Lead and Other Toxic Metals Derived from Drinking-Water Systems in Three West African Countries.

Published on Apr 20, 2021in Environmental Health Perspectives9.031
· DOI :10.1289/EHP7804
Michael Fisher28
Estimated H-index: 28
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill),
Amy Guo4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
+ 6 AuthorsJamie Bartram69
Estimated H-index: 69
(UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)
Sources
Abstract
Background: Exposure to toxic metals (TMs) such as lead can cause lifelong neurodevelopmental impairment and other adverse outcomes. TMs enter drinking water from human activity, geogenic contamina...
References33
Newest
#1Guy HowardH-Index: 24
#2Jamie BartramH-Index: 69
Last. J-A GeereH-Index: 1
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The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this health information product do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines on maps represent approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.
Exposure to toxic metals and metalloids (TMs) such as arsenic and lead at levels of concern is associated with lifelong adverse health consequences. As exposure to TMs from paint, leaded gasoline, canned foods, and other consumer products has decreased in recent decades, the relative contribution of drinking water to environmental TM exposure and associated disease burdens has increased. We conducted a rapid review from June to September 2019 to synthesize information on the sources of TM contam...
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#1Rajiv Chowdhury (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 62
#2Anna Ramond (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 9
Last. Emanuele Di Angelantonio (University of Cambridge)H-Index: 72
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ABSTRACT Objective To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies investigating the association of arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, and copper with cardiovascular disease. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science searched up to December 2017. Review methods Studies reporting risk estimates for total cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, and stroke for levels of arsenic, lead, cadmium, mercury, or copper wer...
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#1Joseph D. Ayotte (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 16
#2Laura Medalie (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 5
Last. Bernard T. Nolan (USGS: United States Geological Survey)H-Index: 30
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Arsenic concentrations from 20 450 domestic wells in the U.S. were used to develop a logistic regression model of the probability of having arsenic >10 μg/L (“high arsenic”), which is presented at the county, state, and national scales. Variables representing geologic sources, geochemical, hydrologic, and physical features were among the significant predictors of high arsenic. For U.S. Census blocks, the mean probability of arsenic >10 μg/L was multiplied by the population using domestic wells t...
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#1Kelsey J. Pieper (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 12
#2Min Tang (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 8
Last. Marc Edwards (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 72
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Flint, Michigan switched to the Flint River as a temporary drinking water source without implementing corrosion control in April 2014. Ten months later, water samples collected from a Flint residence revealed progressively rising water lead levels (104, 397, and 707 μg/L) coinciding with increasing water discoloration. An intensive follow-up monitoring event at this home investigated patterns of lead release by flow rate–all water samples contained lead above 15 μg/L and several exceeded hazardo...
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#1Virginia Rauh (Columbia University)H-Index: 67
#2Amy Margolis (Columbia University)H-Index: 16
Background Environmental exposures play a critical role in the genesis of some child mental health problems. Methods We open with a discussion of children's vulnerability to neurotoxic substances, changes in the distribution of toxic exposures, and cooccurrence of social and physical exposures. We address trends in prevalence of mental health disorders, and approaches to the definition of disorders that are sensitive to the subtle effects of toxic exposures. We suggest broadening outcomes to inc...
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#1Kelsey J. Pieper (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 12
#2Leigh-Anne Krometis (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 16
Last. Marc Edwards (VT: Virginia Tech)H-Index: 72
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Although recent studies suggest contamination by bacteria and nitrate in private drinking water systems is of increasing concern, data describing contaminants associated with the corrosion of onsite plumbing are scarce. This study reports on the analysis of 2,146 samples submitted by private system homeowners. Almost 20% of first draw samples submitted contained lead concentrations above the United States Environmental Protection Agency action level of 15 μg/L, suggesting that corrosion may be a...
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#1Samuel Jerry Cobbina (University for Development Studies)H-Index: 17
#2Abudu Ballu Duwiejuah (University for Development Studies)H-Index: 9
Last. Noel Bakobie (University for Development Studies)H-Index: 4
view all 5 authors...
The study assessed levels of heavy metals in drinking water sources in two small-scale mining communities (Nangodi and Tinga) in northern Ghana. Seventy-two (72) water samples were collected from boreholes, hand dug wells, dug-out, and a stream in the two mining communities. The levels of mercury (Hg), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd) were determined using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). Mean levels (mg/l) of heavy metals in water samples from Nangodi and Tinga ...
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#1Alison P. Sanders (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 18
#2Birgit Claus Henn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 23
Last. Robert O. Wright (ISMMS: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai)H-Index: 78
view all 3 authors...
Lead (Pb) and mercury (Hg) neurotoxicity is well established. In recent years, a growing body of evidence suggests that environmental exposure to other metals including arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and manganese (Mn) and their mixtures also poses public health threats. In this paper, we summarize the recent literature examining the relationship of prenatal and childhood environmental metal exposures with cognitive and behavioral outcomes in children. We conducted a literature search to identify e...
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Cited By3
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#1Jamie Bartram (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 69
#2Karen Setty (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 8
AbstractAt the interface of environmental health science and engineering with policy, programming, and practice, multiple actors and social processes support communication and decisions. Understand...
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#1Darcy M. Anderson (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 5
#2Michael Fisher (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 28
Last. Jamie Bartram (UNC: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)H-Index: 69
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Safe water storage protects household drinking water from microbial contamination, maintaining water quality and preventing diarrhea and other water-borne diseases. However, achieving high adoption and sustained use of safe storage is challenging. Systematic adaptation can address these challenges by improving contextual fit while retaining core functionality to protect water quality. We applied Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles to systematically adapt a safe water storage container (SWSC) interve...
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