The association between overnight fasting and body mass index in older adults: the interaction between duration and timing.

Published on Mar 1, 2021in International Journal of Obesity5.095
· DOI :10.1038/S41366-020-00715-Z
Qian Xiao25
Estimated H-index: 25
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston),
Cici Bauer7
Estimated H-index: 7
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston)
+ 1 AuthorsMary C. Playdon22
Estimated H-index: 22
(UofU: University of Utah)
Sources
Abstract
BACKGROUND Circadian rhythms play an important role in the regulation of eating and fasting, and mistimed dietary intakes may be detrimental to metabolic health. Extended overnight fasting has been proposed as a strategy to better align the eating-fasting cycle with the internal circadian clock, and both observational and experimental studies have linked longer overnight fasting with lower body weight. However, it remains unclear if the timing of overnight fasting modifies the relationship between fasting duration and weight outcomes. METHODS The current study included 495 men and 499 women age 50-74 years. Dietary intake over 12 months was assessed by 24-h dietary recalls every two months, and body-mass index was measured at the beginning, middle and end of the study. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between overnight fasting duration and the likelihood of being overweight or obesity adjusted for multiple confounders, and assessed whether the relationship was modified by the timing of overnight fasting, measured as the midpoint of the fasting period. RESULTS Among participants with early overnight fasting (midpoint < 02:19 am), a longer fasting duration was associated with lower odds of overweight and obesity; while among those with late fasting (≥02:19 am), longer fasting was associated with higher odds of overweight and obesity. Specifically, when compared to the shortest quintile of overnight fasting duration, the longest quintile was associated with a 53% reduction in the odds of overweight and obesity in the early fasting group (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.23, 0.97), but a 2.36-fold increase in the late fasting group (OR = 3.36, 95% CI = 1.48, 7.62). Additionally adjusting for dietary intakes during morning and late evening periods did not affect the observed associations. CONCLUSIONS Longer overnight fasting was associated with a reduced likelihood of being overweight or obese, but only among those with an early timing of fasting.
References54
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#1Mo’ez Al-Islam E. Faris (College of Health Sciences, Bahrain)H-Index: 14
#2Haitham Jahrami (Arabian Gulf University)H-Index: 14
Last. Mohamed Hassanein (Dubai Health Authority)H-Index: 16
view all 6 authors...
Abstract Aim Studies on the effect of Ramadan diurnal intermittent fasting (RDIF) on glucometabolic markers have yielded conflicting results. We conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the effect size for changes in glucometabolic markers in healthy, non-athletic Muslims during Ramadan, and to assess the effect of variable covariates using meta-regression. Methods CINAHL, Cochrane, EBSCOhost, EMBASE, Google Scholar, ProQuest Medical, PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Scopus, and Web of Science databa...
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#1Haitham Jahrami (Arabian Gulf University)H-Index: 14
#2Joud Alsibai (College of Health Sciences, Bahrain)H-Index: 2
Last. Mo’ez Al-Islam E. Faris (College of Health Sciences, Bahrain)H-Index: 14
view all 4 authors...
Studies on the effect of Ramadan diurnal intermittent fasting (RDIF) on body weight have yielded conflicting results. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the effect size of body weight changes in healthy, non-athletic Muslims practicing Ramadan fasting, and to assess the effect of covariates such as age, sex, fasting time duration, season, and country, using subgroup analysis, and meta-regression. Covariate adjustments were performed to explain the variabili...
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#1Matthew J. McAllister (Texas State University)H-Index: 11
#2Brandon L. Pigg (U of M: University of Memphis)H-Index: 1
Last. Hunter S. Waldman (University of North Alabama)H-Index: 8
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Time restricted feeding (TRF) has been shown to improve body composition, blood lipids, and reduce markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. However, most of these studies come from rodent models and small human samples, and it is not clear if the benefits are dependent upon a caloric deficit, or the time restriction nature of TRF. Based off of previous research, we hypothesized that humans following an ad libitum TRF protocol would reduce caloric intake and this caloric deficit wou...
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#1Mo’ez Al-Islam E. Faris (College of Health Sciences, Bahrain)H-Index: 14
#2Haitham JahramiH-Index: 14
Last. Asma A. Obaideen (UPM: Universiti Putra Malaysia)H-Index: 3
view all 4 authors...
Studies on the impact of Ramadan diurnal intermittent fasting (RDIF) on the metabolic syndrome (MetS) components among healthy Muslims observing Ramadan month have yielded contradictory results. This comprehensive meta-analysis aimed to obtain a more stable estimate of the effect size of fasting during Ramadan on the MetS components, examine variability among studies, assess the generalisability of reported results and perform subgroup analyses for associated factors. We searched the CINAHL, Coc...
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#1Michael J. Wilkinson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 7
#2Emily N C Manoogian (Salk Institute for Biological Studies)H-Index: 8
Last. Pam R. Taub (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 25
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Summary In animal models, time-restricted feeding (TRF) can prevent and reverse aspects of metabolic diseases. Time-restricted eating (TRE) in human pilot studies reduces the risks of metabolic diseases in otherwise healthy individuals. However, patients with diagnosed metabolic syndrome often undergo pharmacotherapy, and it has never been tested whether TRE can act synergistically with pharmacotherapy in animal models or humans. In a single-arm, paired-sample trial, 19 participants with metabol...
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#1Dorothea Kesztyüs (University of Ulm)H-Index: 12
#2Petra Cermak (University of Ulm)H-Index: 2
Last. Tibor Kesztyüs (GAU: University of Göttingen)H-Index: 2
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The epidemic of lifestyle-dependent diseases and the failure of previous interventions to combat the main causes demand an alternative approach. Abdominal obesity is associated with most of these diseases and is a good target for therapeutic and preventive measures. Time-restricted feeding (TRF) offers a low-threshold, easy-to-implement lifestyle-modification concept with promising results from animal testing. Here, we describe a pilot study of TRF with abdominally obese participants (waist-to-h...
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#1Mohamed Madkour (College of Health Sciences, Bahrain)H-Index: 9
#2Ahmed El-Serafi (Suez Canal University)H-Index: 12
Last. Mo’ez Al-Islam E. Faris (College of Health Sciences, Bahrain)H-Index: 14
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Abstract Aim A growing body of evidence supports the impact of intermittent fasting on normalizing body metabolism and lowering oxidative stress and inflammation. Mounting evidence confirms that oxidative stress and chronic inflammation trigger the way for the development of metabolic diseases, such as diabetes. This research was conducted to evaluate the impact of Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) on the expression of cellular metabolism (SIRT1 and SIRT3) and antioxidant genes (TFAM, SOD2, and...
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#1Mark A. Guinter (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 8
#2Peter T. Campbell (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 56
Last. Marjorie L. McCullough (ACS: American Cancer Society)H-Index: 96
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Irregular breakfast consumption and food timing patterns in relation to weight status and inflammation were investigated in a cross-sectional manner among 644 participants in the Cancer Prevention Study-3 Diet Assessment Sub-study. Breakfast consumption, and the individual means and the intra-individual standard deviation (i sd ) of time at first intake of the day, duration of daily intake window and midpoint of daily intake window were collected via six 24-h recalls and examined in relation to ...
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#1Stephen D. Anton (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 55
#2Stephanie A. Lee (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 11
Last. Marco Pahor (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 122
view all 7 authors...
A growing body of evidence indicates that time restricted feeding (TRF), a popular form of intermittent fasting, can activate similar biological pathways as caloric restriction, the only intervention consistently found to extend healthy lifespan in a variety of species. Thus, TRF may have the potential to also improve function in older adults. Given the challenges many individuals have in following calorie restriction regimens over long-time periods, evaluation of alternative approaches that may...
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#2Cornelia BraicuH-Index: 29
Last. Ioana Berindan-NeagoeH-Index: 44
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Regarding cancer as a genetic multi-factorial disease, a number of aspects need to be investigated and analyzed in terms of cancer’s predisposition, development and prognosis. One of these multi-dimensional factors, which has gained increased attention in the oncological field due to its unelucidated role in risk assessment for cancer, is diet. Moreover, as studies advance, a clearer connection between diet and the molecular alteration of patients is becoming identifiable and quantifiable, there...
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#1Shreya Chawla ('KCL': King's College London)H-Index: 4
Last. Dina Radenkovic (St Thomas' Hospital)
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Time-Restricted Eating is an eating pattern based on the circadian rhythm which limits daily food intake (usually to ≤12 h/day), unique in that no overt restriction is imposed on the quality, nor quantity, of food intake. This paper aimed to examine the effects of two patterns of TRE, traditional TRE, and Ramadan fasting, on two markers of circadian rhythm, cortisol and melatonin. PubMed and Web of Science were searched up to December 2020 for studies examining the effects of time restricted eat...
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#1Christian Benedict (Uppsala University)H-Index: 53
#2Luiz Eduardo Mateus Brandão (Uppsala University)H-Index: 3
Last. Jonathan Cedernaes (Uppsala University)H-Index: 25
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The COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictions, such as stay-at-home-orders, have significantly altered daily routines and lifestyles. Given their importance for metabolic health, we herein compared sleep and meal timing parameters during vs. before the COVID-19 pandemic based on subjective recall, in an anonymous Swedish survey. Among 191 adults (mean age: 47 years; 77.5% females), we show that social jetlag, i.e., the mismatch in sleep midpoint between work and free days, was reduced by about ...
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