Electronic cigarettes may not be a "safer alternative" of conventional cigarettes during pregnancy: evidence from the nationally representative PRAMS data.

Published on Sep 23, 2020in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth2.239
· DOI :10.1186/S12884-020-03247-6
Sooyong Kim1
Estimated H-index: 1
,
Sooyong Kim1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ -1 AuthorsSanda Cristina Oancea2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UND: University of North Dakota)
Sources
Abstract
Conventional cigarette (CC) smoking is one of the most preventable causes of adverse birth outcomes. Although electronic cigarettes (ECs) are considered to be safer than CCs during pregnancy, the evidence is yet to be presented. This study examines the effects of prenatal EC use on neonatal birth outcomes compared to those of CC smokers and complete tobacco abstainers. Data was extracted from 55,251 pregnant women who participated in the Phase 8 survey of the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System between 2016 and 2018. Participants were classified into three groups based on their smoking behaviors in the third trimester: complete tobacco abstinence, exclusive CC smoking, or exclusive EC use. Adverse outcomes included infants being small-for-gestational-age (SGA), having low birthweight (LBW), and being born at preterm. EC users were matched to complete abstainers and CC smokers who share the same baseline characteristics in race/ethnicity, age, educational attainment, income, prenatal care adequacy, and first- and second-trimester CC smoking statuses. The association between EC use and adverse birth outcomes were examined by survey-weighted logistic regression analyses in the matched population. Among participants, 1.0% of women reported having used ECs during the third trimester, 60% of which reported using ECs exclusively. Neonates of EC users were significantly more likely to be SGA (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.04, 2.96), have LBW (OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.06, 2.22), or be born preterm (OR 1.86; 95% CI 1.11, 3.12) compared to tobacco abstainers. However, odds of EC users’ pregnancies resulting in SGA (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.30, 1.47), LBW (OR 0.71; 95% CI 0.37, 1.37), or preterm birth (OR 1.06; 95% CI 0.46, 2.48) were not significantly lower than those of CC smokers. Even after accounting for shared risk factors between prenatal tobacco use and adverse birth outcomes, EC use remains an independent risk factor for neonatal complications and is not a safer alternative to CC smoking during pregnancy. Until further research is completed, all pregnant women are encouraged to abstain from all tobacco products including ECs.
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Students of mythology will recollect that the second Labour of Hercules was to fight Lernaean Hydra, a nine-headed monster with the endearing habit of growing two ferocious heads to replace each one that was cut-off. Autres temps—conventional cigarettes may be on the way out as legislators (although some rather reluctantly) have tightened the noose, with a rich yield of health benefits for children,1 2 but the new Hydra-head of vaping and other means of inhaling nicotine have come on the scene. ...
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: On September 6, 2019, this report was posted as an MMWR Early Release on the MMWR website (https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr). Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) produce an aerosol by heating a liquid that usually contains nicotine, flavorings, and other chemicals that users inhale, a behavior commonly referred to as "vaping." E-cigarettes can also be used to deliver marijuana and other drugs. In recent months, more than 200 possible cases of acute lung injury potentially associated with vaping were ...
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#1Marcus Orzabal (A&M: Texas A&M University)H-Index: 3
#2Jayanth Ramadoss (A&M: Texas A&M University)H-Index: 19
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Data System. The Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) is an ongoing state-based surveillance system of maternal behaviors, attitudes, and experiences before, during, and shortly after pregnancy. PRAMS is conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Reproductive Health in collaboration with state health departments.Data Collection/Processing. Birth certificate records are used in each participating jurisdiction to select a sample representative of all w...
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ImportanceElectronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use in pregnancy has been steadily increasing and has been hyped as being a safe alternative to cigarette smoking during pregnancy. This review discloses what is currently known about e-cigarette use in pregnancy and the effects of its use on pregnancy ou
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