Using Implementation Science to Disseminate a Lung Cancer Screening Education Intervention Through Community Health Workers

Published on Feb 1, 2021in Journal of Community Health1.883
· DOI :10.1007/S10900-020-00864-2
Lovoria B Williams2
Estimated H-index: 2
(UK: University of Kentucky),
Brent J. Shelton38
Estimated H-index: 38
(UK: University of Kentucky)
+ 2 AuthorsJamie L. Studts34
Estimated H-index: 34
(UK: University of Kentucky)
Sources
Abstract
National lung cancer screening with low dose computed tomography (LDCT) uptake is suboptimal. One factor contributing to slow uptake is lack of awareness. Trained Community Health Workers (CHWs) may be effective in increasing lung cancer screening awareness among disparate populations, however little is known about the processes necessary to scale an intervention for implementation by CHWs in a new area. We examined implementation processes with the RE-AIM framework and pilot tested a CHW-delivered lung cancer education intervention based on the Health Belief Model. We measured pre-post participant knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding cancer screening, lung cancer stigma, and intent to obtain LDCT screening. We used community-engaged strategies to collaborate with a local health system, to identify CHWs. CHWs were trained to recruit participants and deliver the one-session lung cancer education intervention. Seven CHWs and eight community sites participated. Participants (n = 77) were female (53%) primarily low income (62.9%); tobacco use was high (36.9%). Post intervention changes in lung cancer screening knowledge (p =  < .0001), attitudes regarding lung cancer screening benefit (p = .034) and lung cancer stigma. (p = .024) We learned important lessons that will be useful in subsequent scaling. Collaborating with a local health system is a promising method to disseminate a lung cancer screening education intervention.
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References34
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#2Erin K. Tagai (UMD: University of Maryland, College Park)H-Index: 8
Last. Jimmie L. SladeH-Index: 10
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: Project HEAL (Health through Early Awareness and Learning) is an implementation trial that compared two methods of training lay peer community health advisors (CHAs)-in-person ("Traditional") versus web-based ("Technology")-to conduct a series of three evidence-based cancer educational workshops in African American churches. This analysis reports on participant outcomes from Project HEAL. Fifteen churches were randomized to the two CHA training methods and the intervention impact was examined ...
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