Assessing Potential Health Impacts of Wind Turbine Noise: A Longitudinal Look at Multiple End Points

Published on Sep 11, 2019in Environmental Health Perspectives9.031
· DOI :10.1289/EHP5374
Nate Seltenrich12
Estimated H-index: 12
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Abstract
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2011
1 Author (Dorothy S. Small)
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References11
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Background: Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is associated with annoyance and, potentially, sleep disturbances. Objectives: Our objective was to investigate whether long-term WT noise (WTN) exposure ...
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#1Aslak Harbo PoulsenH-Index: 19
#2Ole Raaschou-Nielsen (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 86
Last. Mette Sørensen (RU: Roskilde University)H-Index: 11
view all 8 authors...
Background: Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, raising concerns as to whether WT noise (WTN) increases risk for cardiovascular disease, as observed for traffic noise. Objectives: We aimed to investigate whether long-term exposure to WTN increases risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Methods: We identified all Danish dwellings within a radius 20 times the height of the closest WT and 25% of the dwellings within 20–40 times t...
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#1Alice Freiberg (TUD: Dresden University of Technology)H-Index: 11
#2Christiane Schefter (TUD: Dresden University of Technology)H-Index: 3
Last. Andreas Seidler (TUD: Dresden University of Technology)H-Index: 30
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Abstract Introduction As the global number of wind turbines has increased steadily in recent years, as has the number of studies about putative health effects in residential settings, it is the review purpose to give an overview of the characteristics and methodologies of the scientific literature around the topic in order to identify research gaps and to derive implications for research and practice. Additionally, study findings from higher-quality observational studies as well as results that ...
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#1Aslak Harbo PoulsenH-Index: 19
#2Ole Raaschou-Nielsen (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 86
Last. Mette Sørensen (RU: Roskilde University)H-Index: 11
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Noise from wind turbines (WTs) has been reported more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, and concerns have been raised about whether WT noise (WTN) can increase risk for cardiovascular disease. We aimed to investigate if long-term exposure to WTN increases risk for hypertension, estimated as redemption of prescriptions for antihypertensive drugs. We identified all Danish dwellings within a radius of 20 WT heights from a WT and 25% randomly selected dwellings within 20–40 WT ...
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#1Julia Ageborg Morsing (University of Gothenburg)H-Index: 3
#2Michael Smith (UPenn: University of Pennsylvania)H-Index: 15
Last. Kerstin Persson Waye (University of Gothenburg)H-Index: 19
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The number of onshore wind turbines in Europe has greatly increased over recent years, a trend which can be expected to continue. However, the effects of wind turbine noise on long-term health outcomes for residents living near wind farms is largely unknown, although sleep disturbance may be a cause for particular concern. Presented here are two pilot studies with the aim of examining the acoustical properties of wind turbine noise that might be of special relevance regarding effects on sleep. I...
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#1Aslak Harbo PoulsenH-Index: 19
#2Ole Raaschou-Nielsen (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 86
Last. Mette Sørensen (RU: Roskilde University)H-Index: 11
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Noise from wind turbines (WTs) is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels, raising concerns as to whether WT noise (WTN) may negatively affect health, as reported for traffic noise. We aimed to investigate whether residential WTN is associated with adverse birth outcomes. Based on national registries, we identified all Danish dwellings situated within ≤ 20 wt heights radius and a random selection of 25% of dwellings situated within 20–40 wt heights radius of a WT....
Source
#1Aslak Harbo PoulsenH-Index: 19
#2Ole Raaschou-Nielsen (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 86
Last. Mette Sørensen (RU: Roskilde University)H-Index: 11
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Focus on renewable energy sources and reduced unit costs has led to increased number of wind turbines (WTs). WT noise (WTN) is reported to be highly annoying at levels from 30 to 35 dB and up, whereas for traffic noise people report to be highly annoyed from 40 to 45 dB and up. This has raised concerns as to whether WTN may increase risk for major diseases, as exposure to traffic noise has consistently been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We identi...
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#1Aslak Harbo PoulsenH-Index: 19
#2Ole Raaschou-Nielsen (AU: Aarhus University)H-Index: 86
Last. Mette SørensenH-Index: 58
view all 8 authors...
Abstract Aims The number of people exposed to wind turbine noise (WTN) is increasing. WTN is reported as more annoying than traffic noise at similar levels. Long-term exposure to traffic noise has consistently been associated with cardiovascular disease, whereas effects of short-term exposure are much less investigated due to little day-to-day variation of e.g. road traffic noise. WTN varies considerably due to changing weather conditions allowing investigation of short-term effects of WTN on ca...
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#1David S. Michaud (Health Canada)H-Index: 19
#2Katya Feder (Health Canada)H-Index: 13
Last. Tara Bower (United States Department of Energy Office of Science)H-Index: 7
view all 13 authors...
To investigate the association between self-reported and objective measures of sleep and wind turbine noise (WTN) exposure.The Community Noise and Health Study, a cross-sectional epidemiological study, included an in-house computer-assisted interview and sleep pattern monitoring over a 7 d period. Outdoor WTN levels were calculated following international standards for conditions that typically approximate the highest long-term average levels at each dwelling. Study data were collected between M...
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#1Igho Onakpoya (University of Oxford)H-Index: 33
#2Jack W. O’Sullivan (Bond University)H-Index: 15
Last. Carl Heneghan (University of Oxford)H-Index: 74
view all 4 authors...
© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Noise generated by wind turbines has been reported to affect sleep and quality of life (QOL), but the relationship is unclear. Our objective was to explore the association between wind turbine noise, sleep disturbance and quality of life, using data from published observational studies. We searched Medline, Embase, Global Health and Google Scholar databases. No language restrictions were imposed. Hand searches of bibliography of retrieved full texts were also conducted. The ...
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Noise has been proved to be a risk factor of physiological and psychological health. Therefore, creating a high-quality acoustic environment for people is particularly important. The aims of this study are to explore the basic elements, propose a conceptual framework, and identify the definition of a healthy acoustic environment. Through the method of grounded theory, 75 respondents participated in interviews. The results revealed that (1) "sound sources and acoustic environment," "people's dema...
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