Chilean kindergarten children's beliefs about mathematics: Family matters.

Published on Apr 1, 2019in Developmental Psychology
· DOI :10.1037/DEV0000658
M. Francisca del Río5
Estimated H-index: 5
(UDP: Diego Portales University),
Katherine Strasser14
Estimated H-index: 14
(UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)
+ 2 AuthorsAndrew N. Meltzoff112
Estimated H-index: 112
(UW: University of Washington)
Sources
Abstract
: This study examines the relations among parental beliefs and practices about mathematics, children's beliefs about mathematics, participants' gender, and family socioeconomic status (SES). The study was conducted in Chile, a country with significant gender gaps in standardized test results in mathematics, with boys receiving significantly higher scores than girls. One hundred eighty Chilean kindergarteners (Mage = 5.6 years) of low and high SES completed both implicit and explicit measures of their beliefs about mathematics. Children's mothers and fathers also completed adult versions of these tests, as well as measures of home numeracy practices. This combination of child and parental assessments (both mother and father), including both implicit and explicit measures, provided a wider range of measures than in previous studies. On implicit measures of math-gender stereotypes, boys showed the math = boy stereotype significantly more strongly than girls did. Both fathers and mothers showed this stereotype on both implicit and explicit measures. Fathers also linked me = math (math self-concept) more strongly than mothers on both implicit and explicit measures. Kindergarten girls' implicit math self-concept was explained by a combination of parents' math self-concepts and SES. Taken together, these results show that by 5 years of age children are already developing beliefs about "who does math" in their culture, and that parental beliefs and practices are significantly linked to children's stereotypes and self-concepts about mathematics before they enter formal schooling. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).
📖 Papers frequently viewed together
2016
4 Authors (Laura Pesu, ..., Jari-Erik Nurmi)
13 Citations
1983
5 Citations
References82
Newest
#1Allison Master (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 14
#2Sapna Cheryan (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 25
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 4 authors...
Abstract The gender gap in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement is large and persistent. This gap is significantly larger in technological fields such as computer science and engineering than in math and science. Gender gaps begin early; young girls report less interest and self-efficacy in technology compared with boys in elementary school. In the current study (N = 96), we assessed 6-year-old children’s stereotypes about STEM fields and tested an intervention to develop...
128 CitationsSource
#1M. Francisca del Río (UDP: Diego Portales University)H-Index: 5
#2María Inés Susperreguy (UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)H-Index: 10
Last. Viviana Salinas (UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)H-Index: 4
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTThe current study analyzed maternal and paternal differential influences on numeracy performance in kindergarten children. Participants were 180 Chilean children from backgrounds of low and high socioeconomic status (SES), their mothers, and their fathers. A path analysis was used to explore the influences of both maternal and paternal numeracy practices on children’s numeracy performance and the influences of maternal and paternal expectations and anxiety on those activities. Research F...
31 CitationsSource
#1Jesús Paz-Albo Prieto (URJC: King Juan Carlos University)H-Index: 2
#2Dario Cvencek (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 5 authors...
ABSTRACTIn play, children often explore mathematical ideas that are vital for future learning. Children’s play also reveals gender differences in both colour and toy preferences. The authors examined how gender-related colour preferences of 5-year-olds are related to preferences for math-specific games/toys and gendered beliefs about math. Spanish preschoolers (N = 143) completed a self-report measure of gendered beliefs about math. Children then indicated their favourite colour and were given f...
4 CitationsSource
#1Allison Master (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 14
#2Sapna Cheryan (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 25
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 3 authors...
: The American educational system currently yields disappointing levels of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) engagement and achievement among students. One way to remedy this may be to increase children's motivation in STEM from an early age. This study examined whether a social cue-being part of an experimental "minimal group"-increases STEM engagement in preschoolers (N = 141; 4.5-year-olds). Using a within-subjects design, participants were assigned to a group and an individua...
60 CitationsSource
#1Lin-Gen Bian (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 1
#2Sarah-Jane Leslie (Princeton University)H-Index: 22
Last. Andrei Cimpian (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 26
view all 3 authors...
Common stereotypes associate high-level intellectual ability (brilliance, genius, etc.) with men more than women. These stereotypes discourage women’s pursuit of many prestigious careers; that is, women are underrepresented in fields whose members cherish brilliance (such as physics and philosophy). Here we show that these stereotypes are endorsed by, and influence the interests of, children as young as 6. Specifically, 6-year-old girls are less likely than boys to believe that members of their ...
327 CitationsSource
#1Kou Murayama (University of Reading)H-Index: 39
#2Reinhard Pekrun (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 87
Last. Stephanie Lichtenfeld (LMU: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich)H-Index: 18
view all 5 authors...
Previous research has suggested that parents’ aspirations for their children’s academic attainment can have a positive influence on children’s actual academic performance. Possible negative effects of parental overaspiration, however, have found little attention in the psychological literature. Employing a dual-change score model with longitudinal data from a representative sample of German school children and their parents (N = 3,530; Grades 5 to 10), we showed that parental aspiration and chil...
39 CitationsSource
#1Yarrow Dunham (Yale University)H-Index: 25
#2Andrew Scott Baron (UBC: University of British Columbia)H-Index: 19
Last. Mahzarin R. Banaji (Harvard University)H-Index: 94
view all 3 authors...
The development course of implicit and explicit gender attitudes between the ages of 5 and adulthood is investigated. Findings demonstrate that implicit and explicit own-gender preferences emerge early in both boys and girls, but implicit own-gender preferences are stronger in young girls than boys. In addition, female participants' attitudes remain largely stable over development, whereas male participants' implicit and explicit attitudes show an age-related shift towards increasing female posi...
31 CitationsSource
#1Deborah Rivas-Drake (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 23
#2Aixa D. Marchand (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 7
This study examines the relation of parent educational expectations, cultural socialization, and familism with academic adjustment among 150 Latino parent–adolescent dyads (81% Mexican origin; 79% were mothers). Adolescents (53% girls) responded to measures of school engagement, educational utility, parental educational expectations, cultural socialization, and familism. Results suggest that, after accounting for parents’ reported educational attainment, adolescents’ perceptions of academic and ...
7 CitationsSource
#1Gijsbert Stoet (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 20
#2Drew H. Bailey (UCI: University of California, Irvine)H-Index: 25
Last. David C. Geary (MU: University of Missouri)H-Index: 89
view all 4 authors...
Despite international advancements in gender equality across a variety of societal domains, the underrepresentation of girls and women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) related fields persists. In this study, we explored the possibility that the sex difference in mathematics anxiety contributes to this disparity. More specifically, we tested a number of predictions from the prominent gender stratification model, which is the leading psychological theory of cross-nationa...
65 CitationsSource
#1María Inés Susperreguy (UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)H-Index: 10
#2Pamela E. Davis-Kean (UM: University of Michigan)H-Index: 28
ABSTRACTResearch Findings: The current study analyzed the relation between the amount of mathematical input that preschool children hear (i.e., math talk) from their mothers in their homes and their early math ability a year later. Forty mother–child dyads recorded their naturalistic exchanges in their homes using an enhanced audio-recording device (the Language ENvironment Analysis System). Results from a sample of naturalistic interactions during mealtimes indicated that all mothers involved t...
43 CitationsSource
Cited By14
Newest
Last. Natasha J. CabreraH-Index: 42
view all 39 authors...
This article synthesizes findings from an international virtual conference, funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), focused on the home mathematics environment (HME). In light of inconsistencies and gaps in research investigating relations between the HME and children’s outcomes, the purpose of the conference was to discuss actionable steps and considerations for future work. The conference was composed of international researchers with a wide range of expertise and backgrounds. Present...
1 CitationsSource
#1Isobel A. Heck (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 2
#2Radhika Santhanagopalan (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
Last. Katherine D. Kinzler (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 31
view all 4 authors...
Globally, women are underrepresented in politics. We propose developmental psychology offers an important, yet underused, theoretical lens for understanding and counteracting the gender gap in poli...
1 CitationsSource
#1M. Francisca del Río (UDP: Diego Portales University)H-Index: 5
#2María Inés Susperreguy (UC: Pontifical Catholic University of Chile)H-Index: 10
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 7 authors...
Two hundred and sixty-seven Chilean children from grades 1–3, their fathers and their mothers completed measures of implicit and explicit math-related beliefs (math–gender stereotypes, math self-co...
1 CitationsSource
#1Amifa RajH-Index: 1
#2Ashlee MiltonH-Index: 3
Last. Michael D. EkstrandH-Index: 2
view all 3 authors...
In this position paper, we argue for the need to investigate if and how gender stereotypes manifest in search and recommender this http URL a starting point, we particularly focus on how these systems may propagate and reinforce gender stereotypes through their results in learning environments, a context where teachers and children in their formative stage regularly interact with these systems. We provide motivating examples supporting our concerns and outline an agenda to support future researc...
#1Min MaH-Index: 1
#2Danfeng LiH-Index: 1
Last. Li ZhangH-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Source
#1Zhidan Wang (Jiangsu Normal University)H-Index: 3
#2Frankie T. K. Fong (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 2
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 3 authors...
Children selectively imitate in-group over outgroup individuals under certain experimental conditions. We investigated whether this bias applies to gender in-groups in China. Three- and five-year-olds were shown how to operate novel objects by same-gender and opposite-gender models. Results indicate that the combination of verbally highlighting the gender identity of the model (e.g., 'I am a girl') and making gender norms explicit (e.g., 'girls play this way') significantly enhances high-fidelit...
3 CitationsSource
#1Dario Cvencek (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 11
#2Ružica Brečić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 5
Last. Andrew N. Meltzoff (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 112
view all 4 authors...
Three hundred and ninety-one children (195 girls; Mage = 9.56 years) attending Grades 1 and 5 completed implicit and explicit measures of math attitudes and math self-concepts. Math grades were obtained. Multilevel analyses showed that first-grade girls held a strong negative implicit attitude about math, despite no gender differences in math grades or self-reported (explicit) positivity about math. The explicit measures significantly predicted math grades, and implicit attitudes accounted for a...
1 CitationsSource
Most studies suggest that home numeracy is correlated with preschool children’s current mathematical performance, and also predicts their mathematical performance longitudinally. However, this finding is not universal, and some studies do not suggest a close relationship between home numeracy and preschoolers’ mathematical development. There are several possible reasons for the discrepant findings, including the exact nature of numeracy activities provided, and possible unreliability of parental...
Source
#1Ashli-Ann Douglas (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 1
#2Erica L. Zippert (Purdue University)
Last. Bethany Rittle-Johnson (Vandy: Vanderbilt University)H-Index: 39
view all 3 authors...
Abstract null null Parents' academic beliefs influence the academic support they provide to their children. In this chapter, we review the published literature on empirical studies conducted with parents of preschoolers and propose a conceptual model for how different parental numeracy beliefs uniquely and differentially influence parents' early numeracy support and vary with their demographic characteristics. Parents' numeracy beliefs about their children were more consistently related to their...
Source
#1Lauren Spinner (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 1
#2Lindsey Cameron (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 21
Last. Heather J. Ferguson (UKC: University of Kent)H-Index: 18
view all 3 authors...
Abstract Differences between children’s and parents’ implicit and explicit gender stereotypes were investigated in two experiments. For the first time, the visual world paradigm compared parents’ and 7-8-year-old children’s looking preferences toward masculine- and feminine-typed objects stereotypically associated with a story character’s gender. In Experiment 1 participants listened to sentences that included a verb that inferred intentional action with an object (e.g., “Lilly/Alexander will pl...
Source