Taking a knee: Perceptions of NFL player protests during the National Anthem

Published on Jan 15, 2019in Personality and Individual Differences3.004
· DOI :10.1016/J.PAID.2018.09.009
Evelyn Stratmoen4
Estimated H-index: 4
(KSU: Kansas State University),
Tiffany J. Lawless2
Estimated H-index: 2
(KSU: Kansas State University),
Donald A. Saucier21
Estimated H-index: 21
(KSU: Kansas State University)
Sources
Abstract
Abstract We examined the influence of individual differences in the propensity to make attributions to prejudice (PMAP) and adherence to masculine honor beliefs (MHBs) on perceptions of NFL players who protested during the National Anthem. Those higher in adherence to MHBs perceived protests as inappropriate, and a Black player as more disrespectful when he took a knee, while those higher in PMAP perceived protests as appropriate, and a White player as more disrespectful when he stood. Additionally, those higher in MHBs were less likely to express endorsement that police violence against racial minorities is a current social issue, while those higher in PMAP expressed greater endorsement. Our findings indicate adherence to MHBs and PMAP influence perceptions of the NFL protests, which may influence public reactions to social and political movements. This in turn may influence institutional, political, and social policies, leading to broader social impacts regarding racial inequality.
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Abstract Masculine honor ideology refers to beliefs dictating men should defend against threats, often through violent responses. Research has shown masculine honor beliefs are associated with more positive perceptions of men who defend against threat and less positive perceptions of men who do not defend against threat. Across four studies, we extended these findings by examining whether, as a function of masculine honor beliefs, men are perceived more positively simply for being violent, or if...
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