Late emergence of macular sparing in a stroke patient: Clinical Case Report.

Published on Jul 1, 2017in Medicine1.889
路 DOI :10.1097/MD.0000000000007567
Hye-Young Shin10
Estimated H-index: 10
(Catholic University of Korea),
So Hee Kim1
Estimated H-index: 1
+ 2 AuthorsYoung Chun Lee9
Estimated H-index: 9
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Abstract
RATIONALE: Occlusive cerebrovascular disease is the most common cause of homonymous hemianopia (HH) with macular sparing. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 61-year-old man came to our ophthalmology clinic complaining of right-side hemianopia. Ophthalmic examination, visual field (VF) examination, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed. DIAGNOSES: He had right HH without macular sparing on the initial VF test. And brain MRI 6 days after the visual symptoms began revealed a left occipital infarction. INTERVENTIONS AND OUTCOMES: Thirty-seven days after the onset, his follow-up 24-2 VF examination showed HH with bilateral macular sparing, which was not apparent in the initial VF examination. About 4 months after the stroke, his central 10-2 VF examination also showed HH with bilateral macular sparing. LESSONS: We report a case of HH with a dramatic improvement in central vision several days after an occipital infarction. To our knowledge, this is the first case to show macular sparing developing after several days.
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#4Nancy J Newman (Emory University)H-Index: 2
Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics and clinical-anatomic correlations of homonymous hemianopia (HH). Background: Homonymous hemianopia impairs visual function and frequently precludes driving. Most knowledge of HH is based on relatively few cases with clinical-anatomic correlations. Methods: The authors reviewed medical records of all patients with HH seen in their service between 1989 and 2004. Demographic characteristics, characteristics of visual field defects, causes of visu...
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This article comprises a historical review of the literature pertaining to the representation of the visual field in human primary visual cortex. A brief survey of the anatomy of the visual system is followed by a critical evaluation of the key studies that have informed both the issue of the disproportionate representation of central vision within primary visual cortex, and the anatomical basis underlying the phenomena of macular sparing and macular splitting hemianopia.
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Cited By3
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Abstract null null Purpose null The first reported case of bilateral transient visual field defect, experienced by an ophthalmologist, which developed shortly after COVID-19 vaccination (CoronaVac, Sinovac Biotech Ltd., Beijing, China) and confirmed by computerized automated perimetry. null null null Observation null The patient is a 42-year-old Thai ophthalmologist. He developed blurred vision within an hour after the second dose of COVID-19 vaccination. We described his self-observed of sequen...
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#1Elizabeth L. Saionz (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 3
#2Duje Tadin (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 26
Last. Krystel R. Huxlin (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 26
view all 4 authors...
: Stroke damage to the primary visual cortex (V1) causes a loss of vision known as hemianopia or cortically-induced blindness. While perimetric visual field improvements can occur spontaneously in the first few months post-stroke, by 6 months post-stroke, the deficit is considered chronic and permanent. Despite evidence from sensorimotor stroke showing that early injury responses heighten neuroplastic potential, to date, visual rehabilitation research has focused on patients with chronic cortica...
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#1Elizabeth L. Saionz (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 3
#2Duje Tadin (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 26
Last. Krystel R. Huxlin (UR: University of Rochester)H-Index: 26
view all 4 authors...
Stroke damage to the primary visual cortex (V1) causes a loss of vision known as hemianopia or cortically-induced blindness (CB). While early, spontaneous, perimetric improvements can occur, by 6 months post-stroke, the deficit is considered chronic and permanent. Despite evidence from sensorimotor stroke showing that early injury responses heighten neuroplastic potential, to date, rehabilitation research has focused only on chronic CB patients. Consequently, little is known about the functional...
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