Correlates of Co-Occurring Diabetes and Obesity Among Community Mental Health Program Members With Serious Mental Illnesses.

Published on Jun 15, 2016in Psychiatric Services3.084
路 DOI :10.1176/APPI.PS.201500219
Judith A. Cook53
Estimated H-index: 53
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago),
Lisa A. Razzano27
Estimated H-index: 27
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
+ 5 AuthorsAlberto Santos4
Estimated H-index: 4
(UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)
Sources
Abstract
Objective:This study examined the prevalence and correlates of co-occurring obesity and diabetes among community mental health program members.Methods:Medical screenings of 457 adults with serious mental illnesses were conducted by researchers and peer wellness specialists in four U.S. states. Body mass index was measured directly. Diabetes was assessed via glycosylated hemoglobin and interview self-report. Multivariable logistic regression analysis examined associations with known predictors.Results:In the sample, 59% were obese, 25% had diabetes, and 19% had both conditions. When gender, diagnosis, and site were controlled, co-occurring diabetes and obesity was almost three times as likely among African Americans (OR=2.93) as among participants from other racial groups and half as likely among smokers as among nonsmokers (OR=.58). Older persons and those with poorer self-rated physical health also were more likely to have these co-occurring conditions.Conclusions:Results support the need for culturally ...
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#2Lisa A. Razzano (UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)H-Index: 27
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Physical health screenings were conducted by researchers and peer wellness specialists for adults attending publicly-funded community mental health programs. A total of 457 adults with serious mental illnesses attended health fairs in 4 U.S. states and were screened for 8 common medical co-morbidities and health risk factors. Also assessed were self-reported health competencies, medical conditions, and health service utilization. Compared to non-institutionalized U.S. adults, markedly higher pro...
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