Use of serial measurements of peak flow in the diagnosis of occupational asthma.

Burge Ps1
Estimated H-index: 1
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Abstract
: Occupational asthma is best verified by physiological measures, including (1) measurement of lung function on a single occasion with bronchodilator response, (2) measurement of lung function before and after a workshift, and (3) repeated measurement of PEF over long periods of time, including readings at and away from work. The author describes a qualitative method for distinguishing patterns of PEF change at and away from work which has been effective in the diagnosis of work-related asthma.
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1994
10 Authors (Pierluigi Paggiaro, ..., Petrozzino M)
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Cited By16
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#1Pia Nyn盲s (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 2
#2Sarkku VilpasH-Index: 2
Last. Jukka UittiH-Index: 26
view all 9 authors...
Introduction Moisture damage (MD) exposure at work has been shown to increase the risk of new onset asthma and exacerbation of asthma. However, most of the studies in this field have been questionnaire studies. A small proportion of MD-exposed workers are diagnosed with asthma. Many patients with MD exposure at work referred to secondary healthcare report intermittent hoarseness, loss of voice or difficulty to inhale, referring to functional or organic problems of the larynx. For accurate treatm...
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#1Michael H. Smolensky (University of Texas at Austin)H-Index: 36
#2Alain ReinbergH-Index: 53
Last. Linda Sackett-LundeenH-Index: 21
view all 3 authors...
ABSTRACTThe circadian time structure (CTS) and its disruption by rotating and nightshift schedules relative to work performance, accident risk, and health/wellbeing have long been areas of occupational medicine research. Yet, there has been little exploration of the relevance of the CTS to setting short-term, time-weighted, and ceiling threshold limit values (TLVs); conducting employee biological monitoring (BM); and establishing normative reference biological exposure indices (BEIs). Numerous p...
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#1Kirsi KarvalaH-Index: 1
#1Kirsi Karvala (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 10
#2Elina Toskala (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 42
Last. Henrik Nordman (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 25
view all 6 authors...
Purpose Epidemiological evidence shows that indoor dampness is associated with respiratory symptoms, the aggravation of preexisting asthma, and the development of new-onset asthma. Follow-up studies indicate that symptoms compatible with asthma constitute risk factors for the future development of asthma. The aims of the study were (1) to assess whether asthma-like symptoms (cough, dyspnea, and wheeze) that occur in relation to exposure to damp and moldy work environments lead to the later devel...
Source
#1Kirsi Karvala (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 10
#2Elina Toskala (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 42
Last. Henrik Nordman (Finnish Institute of Occupational Health)H-Index: 25
view all 6 authors...
Objective Damp and moldy indoor environments aggravate pre-existing asthma. Recent meta-analyses suggest that exposure to such environments may also induce new-onset asthma. We assessed the probability of molds being the cause of asthma in a patient series examined because of respiratory symptoms in relation to workplace dampness and molds.
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We performed a cross-sectional study to detect occupational asthma (OA) in 63 subjects occupationally exposed to herbal and fruit tea dust and in 63 corresponding controls. The evaluation included a questionnaire, skin prick tests to workplace and common inhalant allergens, spirometry, and histamine challenge test. The evaluation of the work-relatedness of asthma in the exposed workers was based on serial peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) measurements and bronchoprovocation tests. We found a high...
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The clinical evaluation of newly developed asthma in an adult should always include consideration of his occupational environment, since an abundance of different exposures, which are known causes of asthma, occur in workplaces. Two types of occupational asthma (OA) are distinguished, by whether they appear after a latency period: 1) Immunological OA, characterised by a latency period, caused by high and low-molecular-weight agents, with or without an IgE mechanism 2) Non-immuno- logical, i.e. i...
#1Susan R. Sama (Harvard University)H-Index: 19
#2David C. Christiani (Harvard University)H-Index: 120
Last. Donald K. Milton (Harvard University)H-Index: 65
view all 3 authors...
occupational asthma Susan R. Sama, MS, ScD , David C. Christiani, MD, MPH, MS *, Donald K. Milton, MD, DrPH a Harvard Occupational Health Program, Harvard School of Public Health, Building 1, Room 1402, 665 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Pulmonary and Critical Care Unit, 55 Fruit Street-Bulfinch 148, Boston, MA 02114, USA
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#1Akshay Sood (Southern Illinois University School of Medicine)H-Index: 4
#2Carrie A. Redlich (Yale University)H-Index: 39
Abstract Occupational exposures remain an important cause of lung disease. A number of PFTs are used in the occupational setting, including spirometry, PEF recordings, methacholine challenge testing, lung volume, and DL(CO). These tests are used in a number of situations, including the clinical evaluation and management of patients with possible occupational lung disorders, preplacement and fitness-for-duty examinations, medical screening of exposed workers, impairment and disability evaluations...
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#1James P. Seward (LLNL: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)H-Index: 3
Allergic disease is a serious occupational health concern for individuals who have contact with laboratory animals. Principal respiratory symptoms include allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and asthma. Urticaria (鈥渉ives鈥) is the most common skin manifestation. The overall prevalence of allergic disease among laboratory animal handlers is about 23%, and respiratory allergy is much more common than skin allergy. Prevention of animal allergy depends on control of allergenic material in the work env...
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