Sulfur mustard cutaneous injury characterization based on SKH-1 mouse model: relevance of non-invasive methods in terms of wound healing process analyses.

Published on Feb 1, 2013in Skin Research and Technology2.365
· DOI :10.1111/J.1600-0846.2012.00621.X
Cécile Cléry-Barraud8
Estimated H-index: 8
,
Nina Nguon3
Estimated H-index: 3
+ 5 AuthorsIsabelle Boudry9
Estimated H-index: 9
Sources
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To date, sulphur mustard (SM) cutaneous toxicity has been commonly assessed on account of several animal models such as pigs and weanling pigs. Few experiments however, have been carried out on mice so far. In this study, we aimed at quantifying spontaneous wound healing processes after SM exposure on a SKH-1 mouse model through non-invasive methods over an extended period of time. METHODS: Animals were exposed to 10 μL net SM in a vapor cup system. Measurements of barrier function (Transepidermal water loss), elasticity, skin color exposed to SM vapors were determined by evaporimetry, cutometer and image analysis on 23 animals up to 28 days. Results were subsequently correlated with histological and biochemical analyses. RESULTS: The TEWL parameter stands as a top-ranking criterion to keep track of skin barrier restoration after SM cutaneous intoxication in our SKH-1 mouse model. The R2 and R6 elasticity parameters or L° for the skin color exhibited their ability to be restored after 28 days of SM exposure. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that bio-engineering methods are eligible to evaluate new treatments on SM-induced skin SKH-1 mouse lesions, thus making an allowance for less invasive methods such as histological, genomic or proteomic approaches. Language: en
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Sulfur mustard (SM, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes dermal inflammation, edema and blistering. To investigate the pathogenesis of SM-induced injury, we used a vapor cup model which provides an occlusive environment in which SM is in constant contact with the skin. The dorsal skin of SKH-1 hairless mice was exposed to saturated SM vapor or air control. Histopathological changes, inflammatory markers and DNA damage were analyzed 1–14 days later. After 1 da...
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