Patients' role in reporting adverse drug reactions.

Published on Jul 1, 2004in Expert Opinion on Drug Safety4.25
· DOI :10.1517/14740338.3.4.363
Kees van Grootheest22
Estimated H-index: 22
,
Lolkje T. W. de Jong-van den Berg34
Estimated H-index: 34
Sources
Abstract
This review discusses the involvement of patients in the reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Patients benefit from drugs but also experience their adverse effects. Since concerns about the safety of drugs are also patients’ concerns, the patient could also play a part in decreasing the risks of drug therapy. Patient interest in the safety aspects of drugs is evident. At an international level, the merits of patient reports are being considered. To date, the literature does not yet provide any actual results in relation to the detection of ADRs by patients. Different considerations regarding ADR reporting by patients are discussed. The authors conclude that we should positively value patients’ involvement in drug therapy and their concern regarding possible adverse effects. As a consequence, patients’ reports on ADRs should be accepted.
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#1Kees van GrootheestH-Index: 22
#2Sten Olsson (Uppsala Monitoring Centre)H-Index: 16
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Introduction The participation of the pharmacist in national spontaneous reporting systems for adverse drug reactions (ADRs) has not always been a matter of course. Even today, there are a number of countries, in particular the Scandinavian countries, where pharmacists are not authorised to report ADRs. In those countries in which they are allowed to report, they do not always use this opportunity. Methods We have conducted a review of the literature to investigate the involvement of pharmacists...
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#1Penkarn Kanjanarat (UF: University of Florida)H-Index: 2
Last. Richard SegalH-Index: 21
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A literature review was conducted to identify the drug classes, types of errors, and types of adverse outcomes related to preventable adverse drug events (pADEs). Studies were identified by keyword search of MEDLINE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts and by a manual search. The search was limited to peer-reviewed literature reporting pADEs in hospitalized patients and the frequencies of at least one pADE characteristic. The frequencies of pADEs and their characteristics were summarized u...
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#1Paul J. Seligman (CDER: Center for Drug Evaluation and Research)H-Index: 3
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The NHS in England has introduced a pilot scheme in which people can telephone a helpline to report suspected adverse reactions to a drug. In the scheme members of the public are being invited to telephone one call centre in the NHS Direct system—Beckenham, which covers southeast London—to report their experiences of possible adverse drug reactions. The scheme will be publicised in local media. NHS Direct is a 24 hour telephone and online advice and health information service, launched in 1998 a...
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#1Sally Morrison-Griffiths (University of Liverpool)H-Index: 5
#2Tom Walley (University of Liverpool)H-Index: 54
Last. Munir Pirmohamed (University of Liverpool)H-Index: 114
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Summary Schemes for spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions are important to post-marketing safety surveillance worldwide. In the UK, doctors, dentists, coroners, and pharmacists are allowed to report through the yellow card scheme, but nurses were not until October, 2002. We used a similar programme to assess the role of community and hospital nurses in reporting of adverse drug reactions. The proportion and quality of reports received from nurses was similar to that of those received f...
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Women taking oral contraceptives containing gestodene or desogestrel (the so called third generation oral contraceptives) have a higher risk of venous thrombosis than women taking a second generation pill.1 After the first publication on the subject, in 1995,2 the discussion in Dutch medical journals was conservative; prescribing physicians were advised to not alarm women who did not have a risk of deep vein thrombosis, be cautious in the prescribing of third generation oral contraceptives to yo...
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#1Kees van GrootheestH-Index: 22
#2Linda de GraafH-Index: 1
Last. Lolkje T. W. de Jong-van den Berg (UG: University of Groningen)H-Index: 34
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The direct reporting of adverse drug reactions by patients is becoming an increasingly important topic for discussion in the world of pharmacovigilance. At this time, few countries accept consumer reports.
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#1Carmel M. Hughes ('QUB': Queen's University Belfast)H-Index: 59
Self-medication, using non-prescription drugs, is beneficial to patients, healthcare professionals, the pharmaceutical industry and governments. Although many non-prescription medications are effective, misuse and abuse of these products can arise. Monitoring of specific populations and products, in addition to data recording and educating and informing patients, may go some way towards promoting safe and effective self-medication.
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#1Jerry H. Gurwitz (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 108
#2Susan E. Andrade (UMMS: University of Massachusetts Medical School)H-Index: 58
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#1Elsy Ramia (Lebanese American University)H-Index: 8
#2Rony M. Zeenny (AUB: American University of Beirut)H-Index: 9
Last. Pascale Salameh (University of Nicosia)H-Index: 30
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There is a limited number of studies assessing the epidemiology of Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) in the outpatient setting, especially those that do not result in healthcare use. The primary objective of this study was to assess the prevalence and determinants of self-reported ADEs among Lebanese outpatients. It was a cross-sectional observational study performed among Lebanese outpatients visiting community pharmacies across Lebanon. A questionnaire was designed to elicit patients' relevant inform...
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#1Xiaoying Li (Academy of Medical Sciences, United Kingdom)H-Index: 1
#2Xin Lin (Academy of Medical Sciences, United Kingdom)H-Index: 1
Last. Jinjing Guo (Academy of Medical Sciences, United Kingdom)H-Index: 1
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BACKGROUND Licensed drugs may cause unexpected adverse reactions in patients, resulting in morbidity, risk of mortality, therapy disruptions, and prolonged hospital stays. Officially approved drug package inserts list the adverse reactions identified from randomized controlled clinical trials with high evidence levels and worldwide postmarketing surveillance. Formal representation of the adverse drug reaction (ADR) enclosed in semistructured package inserts will enable deep recognition of side e...
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#1Rania Al Dweik (Abu Dhabi University)H-Index: 1
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BACKGROUND Spontaneous reporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) is an important source of information for post-marketing drug safety evaluation. Most countries have public access to reporting systems, but patients report only 3% of all ADRs. Little is known about factors affecting patient reporting. Our aim was to explore patients' experiences reporting ADRs and their views on the usability of the Canadian Vigilance reporting forms on MedEffect. METHODS An interpretive description qualitative ...
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#1Doaa AlkhalidiH-Index: 1
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Ensuring drug safety among the patients is the main domain of pharmacovigilance activities worldwide. A pharmacovigilance system was established in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2008. Research evidence reflects that the current system is lacking in active participation from patients, and also, the inadequate role of healthcare professionals is anticipated. In this context, it is pertinent to know the general public’s understandings and their patterns of safe use of medication, which are unex...
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#1Artem LobantsevH-Index: 3
#2Aleksandra VatianH-Index: 4
Last. Natalia GusarovaH-Index: 4
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#2Emel AykacH-Index: 2
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#1Ben Kim (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 3
#2Anis Sharafoddini (UW: University of Waterloo)H-Index: 4
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Background: General consumers can now easily access drug information and quickly check for potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) through mobile health (mHealth) apps. With aging population in Canada, more people have chronic diseases and comorbidities leading to increasing numbers of medications. The use of mHealth apps for checking PDDIs can be helpful in ensuring patient safety and empowerment. Objective: The aim of this study was to review the characteristics and quality of publicly availa...
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