Systemic administration of candidate antivesicants to protect against topically applied sulfur mustard in the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM).

Published on Jun 29, 2001in Journal of Applied Toxicology3.446
· DOI :10.1002/1099-1263(200012)20:1+<::AID-JAT666>3.0.CO;2-G
Michael C. Babin13
Estimated H-index: 13
(United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense),
Karen M. Ricketts6
Estimated H-index: 6
(United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense)
+ 3 AuthorsRobert P. Casillas20
Estimated H-index: 20
(United States Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense)
Source
Abstract
The mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) provides a quantitative edema response as well as histopathological and biochemical endpoints as measurements of inflammation and tissue damage following exposure to the chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (HD). In the MEVM, several topically applied anti-inflammatory agents provided a significant degree of protection against HD-induced edema and dermal-epidermal separation. This study evaluated the protective effects of three of these pharmacological compounds when administered systemically in the MEVM. Alzet osmotic pumps were used to deliver a subcutaneous dose of the appropriate anti-inflammatory agent, starting 24 h before exposure to sulfur mustard and continuing until 24 h post-exposure to HD. Twenty-four hours after pump implantation, 5 μl of a 195 mM (0.16 mg) solution of sulfur mustard (density = 1.27 g ml -1 ; MW = 159; purity = 97.5%) in methylene chloride was applied to the inner surface of the right ear of each mouse. Sulfur mustard injury in the mouse ear was measured by both edema response (fluid accumulation) and histopathological damage (necrosis, epidermal-dermal separation). The systemic administration of hydrocortisone, indomethacin and olvanil provided a significant reduction in edema (24%, 26% and 22%, respectively) from the positive control. Compared to HD-positive controls, hydrocortisone, indomethacin and olvanil caused a significant reduction in subepidermal blisters (71%, 52% and 57%, respectively) whereas only hydrocortisone produced a significant reduction in contralateral epidermal necrosis (41%). We show here that these anti-inflammatory drugs are effective when administered systemically in the MEVM.
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