Men of Honor: Examining Individual Differences in Masculine Honor Beliefs

Published on Jan 1, 2014
· DOI :10.1007/978-1-4614-6931-5_5
Donald A. Saucier21
Estimated H-index: 21
(KSU: Kansas State University),
Jessica L. McManus5
Estimated H-index: 5
(KSU: Kansas State University)
Sources
Abstract
The experience of masculinity includes many expectations for what it means to be a man. Research has demonstrated that men raised in the American South incorporate into their identities the beliefs that provocation requires an aggressive response so that they may solidify their masculinity and reduce their future vulnerability to transgressions. We contend that while there are cultural differences in the extent to which men embrace honor as key to their masculinity, there is variability among men within the same culture, beyond the American South, and this variability provides meaningful prediction of men’s perceptions of and reactions within various social situations. Thus, examining masculine honor beliefs from an individual difference perspective provides greater understanding of male identity in cultures outside of the American South. The purpose of this chapter is to describe our research on the measurement and predictive utility of individual differences in men’s adherence to masculine honor beliefs.
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