Occupational medicine (Philadelphia, Pa.)
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: This is an overview of ethical issues in occupational health research involving human subjects. Research that requires human subjects review must be distinguished from surveillance or public health practice. Confidentiality and privacy concerns are particularly important in an occupational setting because individual participants may be identifiable through job title or other characteristics, and because there may be concerns about employment discrimination associated with participation status ...
: The number of preventable occupational health and safety (OHS) tragedies that occur yearly requires a deeper examination of the ethics that inform health and safety policies and practices. This article selects a few industrial sectors for closer examination to illustrate challenges and opportunities. Topics addressed include: equitable distribution of resources, ethically acceptable global standards for OHS for all workers, and international use of pesticides and the export of banned chemicals...
: Team physicians act as occupational physicians in many traditional ways. However, they face unique ethical challenges when caring for athletes. Sports physicians must be cognizant of special aspects of the doctor-patient relationship, as well as issues related to informed consent, autonomy, and confidentiality. Conflicts of interest with players themselves, as well as with team management, are common. Team physicians must act professionally and maintain ethical principles, even in the high-pre...
#1Linda Forst (UIC: University of Illinois at Chicago)H-Index: 20
#2Charles Levenstein (University of Massachusetts Lowell)H-Index: 20
: Occupational health has always operated at the intersection of corporate economic concerns and worker health. Conflicting demands on the loyalty of occupational health professionals by the interests of labor and industry have made negotiating this minefield an essential part of the practice of occupational medicine. In recent years, occupational health professionals have found themselves increasingly required to rationalize worker health measures with economic arguments. This has led to physic...
#1Joseph LaDou (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 17
#2Dan J. TennenhouseH-Index: 1
Last. Ilise L FeitshansH-Index: 1
view all 3 authors...
Some international organizations and many societies of health and safety professionals have codes of ethics (conduct). The intent is to promote ethical behavior, though compliance is voluntary and enforcement is generally not possible. It is important that all occupational health and safety professionals adopt and live up to the same code. It also is important that the same code of conduct apply to industrializing countries just as it applies to developed countries. A new International Code of C...
: Occupational physicians are frequently participants in a legal arena in which the interests of the patient are in conflict with those of the patient's employer. What is best for the patient may be viewed as financially burdensome or damaging to the employer. Pressures may be brought to bear upon the doctor, who is also concerned with furthering business relationships with the employer, to take action that is inimical to the patient's well-being. This article addresses legal liability and ethic...
Occupational disease outbreak investigations usually involve rapid, small-scale analysis of reports of diseases with a suspected occupational etiology, usually in a single workplace or among workers of a single employer. Ethical issues are similar to those encountered in epidemiologic studies in the workplace, with the added constraints of the need to respond rapidly, limited numbers of subjects, low statistical power, and the mandate to issue results even when the ability to generalize them is ...
: In a departure from the usual Occupational Medicine: State of the Art Reviews article, this piece comprises responses from two occupational physicians to the question of how balance is achieved between employer and patient interests in occupational medicine. The authors discuss the ethical dilemmas that may arise in such relationships, negotiation of confrontations, physician responsibilities, and conflict resolution.
#1Robert J. McCunney (MIT: Massachusetts Institute of Technology)H-Index: 20
: The human genome project has led to impressive scientific advances in understanding the genetic basis of disease. To date, genetic risks associated with occupational illnesses are not well understood. Recent research, however, has uncovered an allele that appears directly related to the risk of contracting chronic beryllium disease; other chromosomal abnormalities have been identified in association with cancer. Progress from the human genome project has potential implications for predicting, ...
: It is said that ethics comprise principles of good conduct or standards governing the conduct of the members of a profession. These standards are unbending and strict, yet the reality is that occupational health professionals are subject to many conflicting pressures. Most of these stresses arise from the fact that employers and insurance companies, not worker-patients, fund OH services, and these two entities have overlapping, yet distinct, interests. OH professionals must consider the health...
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