Alka Obadić
University of Zagreb
Higher educationCluster (physics)EconomySociologyBusinessLabour economicsHumanitiesEconomicsPolitical scienceTourismGeographyData envelopment analysisUnemploymentEuropean unionOecd countriesCluster developmentDemographic economicsEconomic growthEconomic systemCroatian
118Publications
7H-index
168Citations
Publications 105
Newest
#1Dejan RavšeljH-Index: 4
#2Alka ObadićH-Index: 7
Last. Aleksander AristovnikH-Index: 16
view all 3 authors...
This paper analyzes labor market institutions convergence in the European Union (EU) to test for economic integration of the EU countries. The convergence is analyzed for five indicators of labor market institutions: employment protection legislation index (EPL), tax wedge, unemployment benefits, active labor market policies, and minimum wages. Convergence is measured using standard beta and sigma convergence complemented with a more sophisticated and more flexible approach of the log-t regressi...
Purpose: Administrative barriers to employment pose a problem in Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) which have an essential role in the European economy, compared to large ones. The existing rigidity and inflexibility of the labor market have further slowed down their position in creating new jobs. Therefore, the main goal of this paper is to evaluate the current state of administrative barriers to employment for SMEs in Croatia and Slovenia. Design/methodology/approach: Applying descript...
1 CitationsSource
Last. Iva TolićH-Index: 1
view all 12 authors...
#2Alka ObadićH-Index: 7
view all 3 authors...
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
This chapter concentrates on the macro-level analysis of the position of highly educated women in the labour market of the EU-28, using aggregate indicators calculated from different existing secondary databases. The variables analysed include enrolment and graduation by educational level and field of study, demand and supply with respect to employment, participation in knowledge-intensive activities hierarchical status and gender pay gap. The analysis reveals the existence of gender segregation...
Source
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
This chapter discusses four specific areas of gender segregation—segregation in politics, segregation in entrepreneurship, segregation in STEM and segregation in communist and post-communist economies. While in the first three areas, although significant improvements are evident, we continue to encounter lower participation and engagement by women because of the many barriers imposed upon them, a communist ideology (either from the past for post-communist countries or still present for contempor...
Source
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
The chapter discusses six main areas of gender segregation—essentialist segregation, educational segregation, employment segregation, occupational segregation, hierarchical segregation and pay segregation. Various types of gender segregation coexist and are highly correlated, exhibiting the spillover effect. Therefore, this chapter details numerous elements of each type of segregation, such as biological differences between genders; supply and demand side of gender essentialism; gender roles soc...
Source
#1Nina Pološki Vokić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 8
#2Alka Obadić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 7
Last. Dubravka Sinčić Ćorić (University of Zagreb)H-Index: 4
view all 3 authors...
In this chapter, the results of primary research conducted on a sample of highly educated women from different educational areas, occupational groups, industries and countries, and with diverse demographic characteristics, are presented. The results show that, for highly educated women, the major issues in career development are related to difficulties in balancing between their personal and business life; therefore, improved organisational policies that enable an effective work-life balance, as...
Source