Uriel Haran
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
StatisticsTraitCalibration (statistics)Competitor analysisProduct (category theory)AttributionBusinessEconometricsPsychologyEconomicsSet (psychology)CognitionInterval (mathematics)Cognitive psychologyLaw and economicsRange (statistics)Data scienceControl (management)HonestyHarmSuspectCorporationQuality (business)Advice (complexity)EnforcementConstrualsTask (project management)Competition (economics)IncentiveAffect (psychology)Public relationsComputer scienceConfidence intervalOutsourcingReputationOverconfidence effectIllusory superioritySocial psychologyBusiness decision mapping
18Publications
7H-index
359Citations
Publications 16
Newest
#1Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
#2Shaul Shalvi (UvA: University of Amsterdam)H-Index: 23
Recipients of advice expect it to be both highly informed and honest. Suspecting either one of these attributes reduces the use of the advice. Does the degree of advice use depend on the reason for suspecting its accuracy? Five experiments tested the effect of the type of suspicion on advice taking. We find that recipients of advice discount it more severely when they suspect intentional bias than when they suspect unintentional error, for example, due to the advisor’s insufficient knowledge. Th...
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#1Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
Abstract Both guilt and competition motivate goal achievement. Guilt increases task motivation, but also enhances prosocial goals. Competition motivates individual success, but its zero-sum nature makes personal and prosocial goals mutually exclusive. This work explores the relationship between guilt, competition and goal-achievement motivation. In five experiments, guilt was associated with higher motivation to achieve individual goals, but its effect on motivation in competitive settings was n...
1 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer Marie Logg (Harvard University)H-Index: 8
#2Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
Last. Don A. Moore (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 53
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: Are overconfident beliefs driven by the motivation to view oneself positively? We test the relationship between motivation and overconfidence using two distinct, but often conflated measures: better-than-average (BTA) beliefs and overplacement. Our results suggest that motivation can indeed affect these faces of overconfidence, but only under limited conditions. Whereas BTA beliefs are inflated by motivation, introducing some specificity and clarity to the standards of assessment (Experiment 1...
11 CitationsSource
#1Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
#2Doron Teichman (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 9
Last. Yuval Feldman (BIU: Bar-Ilan University)H-Index: 12
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Social enforcement of norms governing appropriate business practices, through online and social networks, is regarded as an effective alternative to formal, state‐sponsored enforcement. However, recent research finds that such norms are interpreted differently when applied to individual actors than when applied to corporations. This article finds that this difference transcends to enforcement, and that willingness to actively respond to a transgression depends on both the transgressor's identity...
2 CitationsSource
#1Daffie Konis (TAU: Tel Aviv University)H-Index: 1
#2Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
Last. Shahar Ayal (Interdisciplinary Center Herzliya)H-Index: 16
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We describe a bias in moral judgment in which the mere existence of other victims reduces assessments of the harm suffered by each harmed individual. Three experiments support the seemingly paradoxical relationship between the number of harmed individuals and the perceived severity of the harming act. In Experiment 1a, participants expressed lower punitive intentions toward a perpetrator of an unethical act that hurt multiple people and assigned lower monetary compensation to each victim than di...
4 CitationsSource
#1Don A. Moore (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 53
#2Elizabeth R. Tenney (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 15
Last. Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
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27 CitationsSource
#1Uriel HaranH-Index: 7
#2Ilana RitovH-Index: 35
Last. Barbara A. MellersH-Index: 56
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Source
#1Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
#2Yuval Feldman (BIU: Bar-Ilan University)H-Index: 12
Last. Doron Teichman (HUJI: Hebrew University of Jerusalem)H-Index: 9
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One of the primary instruments which people use to retaliate against unfair practices is social enforcement: the decentralized action of monitoring, identifying, and reporting misconducts. Social enforcement is widely recognized as a key incentive of good practices by service providers. Technological advancement and the rise of the internet and social networks have increased the accessibility and expanded the variety of available sanctions against violators of business relationships. Whereas in ...
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#1Daylian M. Cain (Yale University)H-Index: 20
#2Don A. Moore (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 53
Last. Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
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Entrepreneurs are often described as overconfident (or at least very confident), even when entering difficult markets. However, recent laboratory findings suggest that difficult tasks tend to produce underconfidence. How do entrepreneurs maintain confidence in difficult tasks? Our two laboratory experiments and one archival study reconcile the literature by distinguishing types of overconfidence and identifying what type is most prominent in each type of task. Furthermore, we critically examine ...
64 CitationsSource
#1Uriel Haran (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 7
#2Don A. Moore (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 53
Every business decision depends on making a forecast of the consequences of the decision. Although most organizations do forecasting, most do so badly. They ask either for a point prediction—a single “best guess” forecast, when everyone knows that this is an oversimplification of the truth, or for a simple range forecast, which is likely to result in biased predictions more often than not. In this article, the authors propose a better approach, one that takes seriously the uncertainty in forecas...
5 CitationsSource