Matthew S. Panizzon
University of California, San Diego
Internal medicineEndocrinologyDevelopmental psychologyDemographyPsychologyHeritabilityTwin studyNeuroscienceCognitionYoung adultDiseaseMiddle ageCerebral cortexCognitive impairmentAudiologyGenetic variationClinical psychologyGenetic correlationMedicineBiologyEpisodic memory
177Publications
35H-index
4,513Citations
Publications 169
Newest
#1Jeremy A. Elman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 15
#2Matthew S. Panizzon (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 35
Last. William S. Kremen (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 70
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Understanding genetic influences on Alzheimer’s disease (AD) may improve early identification. AD polygenic risk scores (AD-PRSs) are associated with increased odds of AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Additional sources of genetic risk may also contribute to disease outcomes. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a risk factor for AD, interacts with AD pathology, and is also heritable. We showed that incidence-based and prevalence-based CAD-PRSs moderate the association between the AD...
1 CitationsSource
#1Daniel E. Gustavson (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 3
#1Daniel E. Gustavson (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 16
Last. William S. Kremen (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 70
view all 13 authors...
Abstract Objective Test the hypothesis that individual differences in episodic memory and verbal fluency in cognitively normal middle-aged adults will predict progression to amnestic MCI after 6 years. Method 1484 male twins, 842 of whom were cognitively normal at wave 1 completed measures of episodic memory and verbal fluency at up to 2 time-points (mean age 56 and 62 years). Results In the subgroup of 842, poor episodic memory predicted progression to both amnestic MCI (OR=4.42, 95% CI [2.44, ...
Source
#1Rishi Deka (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 6
#2Daniel R. Simpson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 14
Last. Brent S. Rose (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 19
view all 9 authors...
There is conflicting evidence regarding the association between androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PC) and the risk of developing stroke and thromboembolic events. Our study evaluated the association between ADT use and development of stroke, transient ischemic attack (TIA), deep vein thrombosis (DVT), and pulmonary embolism (PE) in a homogenous group of men with PC treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) after controlling for multiple sources of confounding. Observat...
Source
#1Jeremy A. Elman (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 15
#2Matthew S. Panizzon (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 35
Last. William S. Kremen (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 70
view all 12 authors...
Author(s): Elman, JA; Panizzon, MS; Gillespie, NA; Hagler, DJ; Fennema-Notestine, C; Eyler, LT; McEvoy, LK; Neale, MC; Lyons, MJ; Franz, CE; Dale, AM; Kremen, WS | Abstract: The human hippocampus can be subdivided into subfields with unique functional properties and differential vulnerability to disease or neuropsychiatric conditions. Identifying genes that confer susceptibility to such processes is an important goal in developing treatments. Recent advances in automatic subfield segmentation fr...
8 CitationsSource
#1Daniel E. Gustavson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 16
#2Matthew S. Panizzon (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 35
Last. Naomi P. Friedman (CU: University of Colorado Boulder)H-Index: 28
view all 9 authors...
: The relationship of verbal fluency to executive functions (EFs) remains somewhat unclear. Verbal fluency is sometimes considered an EF ability, but is not often included in the same models as other well-studied EFs (inhibition, shifting, and working memory updating). We examined the associations between verbal fluency and EFs at 2 ages with the unity/diversity model, which includes common and domain-specific EF factors. Participants were 813 adolescent twins from the Colorado Longitudinal Twin...
9 CitationsSource
#1Mark W. Logue (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 33
#2Matthew S. Panizzon (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 35
Last. William S. Kremen (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 70
view all 14 authors...
Author(s): Logue, MW; Panizzon, MS; Elman, JA; Gillespie, NA; Hatton, SN; Gustavson, DE; Andreassen, OA; Dale, AM; Franz, CE; Lyons, MJ; Neale, MC; Reynolds, CA; Tu, X; Kremen, WS | Abstract: Early identification of younger, non-demented adults at elevated risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial because the pathological process begins decades before dementia onset. Toward that end, we showed that an AD polygenic risk score (PRS) could identify mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in adults who w...
54 CitationsSource
#1William S. Kremen (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 70
#2Asad Beck (SDSU: San Diego State University)H-Index: 5
Last. Carol E. Franz (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 48
view all 16 authors...
How and when education improves cognitive capacity is an issue of profound societal importance. Education and later-life education-related factors, such as occupational complexity and engagement in cognitive-intellectual activities, are frequently considered indices of cognitive reserve, but whether their effects are truly causal remains unclear. In this study, after accounting for general cognitive ability (GCA) at an average age of 20 y, additional education, occupational complexity, or engage...
31 CitationsSource
#1Allison R. Kaup (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 15
#2Rosemary Toomey (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 40
Last. William S. Kremen (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 70
view all 9 authors...
Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depressive symptoms each increase the risk for cognitive impairment in older adults. We investigated whether TBI ha...
4 CitationsSource
#1Daniel E. Gustavson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 16
#2Carol E. Franz (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 48
Last. William S. Kremen (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 70
view all 9 authors...
Multiple executive functions (EFs) are associated with trait anxiety and depression symptoms, but it is unclear how genetic and/or environmental factors account for these associations and whether they are explained by general variance underlying multiple EFs (i.e., common EF). In this study, 1,207 male twins completed seven EF tasks and measures of trait anxiety and depression symptoms at an average age of 62 years. The common EF factor was associated with both anxiety (r = −.24) and depression ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Daniel E. Gustavson (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 16
#2Sean N. Hatton (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 22
Last. William S. Kremen (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 70
view all 14 authors...
Abstract Individual differences in white matter tract microstructure, measured with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), demonstrate substantial heritability. However, it is unclear to what extent this heritability reflects global genetic influences or tract-specific genetic influences. The goal of the current study was to quantify the proportion of genetic and environmental variance in white matter tracts attributable to global versus tract-specific influences. We assessed fractional anisotropy (FA)...
10 CitationsSource