Jeffrey D. Laskin
Rutgers University
Internal medicineEndocrinologyPathologyMolecular biologyProinflammatory cytokineTumor necrosis factor alphaChemistryImmunologyOxidative stressInflammationNitric oxide synthaseLungMacrophageSulfur mustardLung injuryNitric oxideBiochemistryMedicineBiologyCell biologyPharmacology
342Publications
69H-index
11.8kCitations
Publications 342
Newest
#1Rama Malaviya (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 14
#2Alyssa Bellomo (RU: Rutgers University)
Last. Jeffrey D. Laskin (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 69
view all 11 authors...
Abstract null null Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent that causes severe injury to the respiratory tract. This is accompanied by an accumulation of macrophages in the lung and the release of the proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. In these studies, we analyzed the effects of blocking TNFα on lung injury, inflammation and oxidative stress induced by inhaled SM. Rats were treated with SM vapor (0.4 mg/kg) or air control by intratracheal inhalation. This was ...
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#1Laurie B. Joseph (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 12
#2Marion K. Gordon (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 21
Last. Jeffrey D. Laskin (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 69
view all 8 authors...
Sulfur mustard (SM; bis (2-chloroethyl) sulfide) is a potent vesicant which causes irritation of the conjunctiva and damage to the cornea. In the present studies, we characterized the ocular effects of SM in New Zealand white rabbits. Within one day of exposure to SM, edema and hazing of the cornea were observed, followed by neovascularization which persisted for at least 28 days. This was associated with upper and lower eyelid edema and conjunctival inflammation. The conjunctiva is composed of ...
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#1Alessandro Venosa (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 12
#2L. Cody Smith (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 5
Last. Debra L. Laskin (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 71
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Abstract Activated macrophages have been implicated in lung injury and fibrosis induced by the cytotoxic alkylating agent, nitrogen mustard (NM). Herein, we determined if macrophage activation is associated with histone modifications and altered miRNA expression. Treatment of rats with NM (0.125 mg/kg, i.t.) resulted in increases in phosphorylation of H2A.X in lung macrophages at 1 d and 3 d post-exposure. This DNA damage response was accompanied by methylation of histone (H) 3 lysine (K) 4 and ...
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#2Suneel KumarH-Index: 17
Last. Indu Pal KaurH-Index: 40
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The study aims to develop high drug-loaded (about 15% lipid matrix) curcumin solid lipid nanoparticles (CSLNs) for wound healing. CSLNs prepared by hot, high-pressure homogenization, without using organic solvents, were optimized using the Taguchi design followed by the central composite design. The optimized CSLNs exhibited a high assay/drug content (0.6% w/w), solubility (6 × 105 times), and EE (75%) with a particle size < 200 nm (PDI—0.143). The CSLNs were safe (in vitro and in vivo), photost...
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#1Rama Malaviya (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 14
#2Howard M. Kipen (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 44
Last. Debra L. Laskin (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 71
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Abstract Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by destruction and remodeling of the lung due to an accumulation of collagen and other extracellular matrix components in the tissue. This results in progressive irreversible decreases in lung capacity, impaired gas exchange and eventually, hypoxemia. A number of inhaled and systemic toxicants have been identified that cause pulmonary fibrosis including bleomycin, silica, asbestos, nanoparticles, mustard vesicants, nitrofurantoin, amiodarone, and ioni...
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#1Rama Malaviya (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 14
#2Elena Abramova (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 8
Last. Debra L. Laskin (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 71
view all 13 authors...
Sulfur mustard (SM) inhalation causes debilitating pulmonary injury in humans which progresses to fibrosis. Herein, we developed a rat model of SM toxicity which parallels pathological changes in the respiratory tract observed in humans. SM vapor inhalation caused dose (0.2-0.6 mg/kg)-related damage to the respiratory tract within 3 days of exposure. At 0.4-0.6 mg/kg, ulceration of the proximal bronchioles, edema and inflammation were observed, along with a proteinaceous exudate containing infla...
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