Andy Sombke
University of Vienna
NeuroanatomyAnatomyVentral nerve cordOlfactionNeuroscienceEcologyArthropodLithobius forficatusCentipedeNeuropilJumping spiderMarpissa muscosaScutigera coleoptrataMyriapodaAppendageNervous systemEvolutionary biologyBiologyZoologySensory system
52Publications
13H-index
568Citations
Publications 48
Newest
Bryozoans are sessile aquatic suspension feeders in mainly marine, but also freshwater habitats. Most species belong to the marine and calcified Cheilostomata. Since this taxon remains mostly unstudied regarding its neuroanatomy, the focus of this study is on the characterization and ground pattern reconstruction of the autozooidal nervous system based on six representatives. A common neuronal innervation pattern is present in the investigated species: a cerebral ganglion is located at the base ...
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#1Andrew A. Walker (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 15
#2Samuel D. Robinson (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 15
Last. Glenn F. King (UQ: University of Queensland)H-Index: 72
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Venoms have evolved independently several times in Lepidoptera. Limacodidae is a family with worldwide distribution, many of which are venomous in the larval stage, but the composition and mode of action of their venom is unknown. Here, we use imaging technologies, transcriptomics, proteomics, and functional assays to provide a holistic picture of the venom system of a limacodid caterpillar, Doratifera vulnerans Contrary to dogma that defensive venoms are simple in composition, D. vulnerans prod...
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#1Andy Sombke (University of Vienna)H-Index: 13
#2Carsten H. G. Müller (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 25
Last. Müller Chg (University of Greifswald)
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BACKGROUND The jointed appendage is a key novelty in arthropod evolution and arthropod legs are known to vary enormously in relation to function. Among centipedes, the ultimate legs always are distinctly different from locomotory legs, and different centipede taxa evolved different structural and functional modifications. In Geophilomorpha (soil centipedes), ultimate legs do not participate in locomotion and were interpret to serve a sensory function. They can be sexually dimorphic and in some s...
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#1Cheyenne Tait (ND: University of Notre Dame)H-Index: 2
#2Hinal Kharva (NCBS: National Centre for Biological Sciences)
Last. Shannon B. Olsson (NCBS: National Centre for Biological Sciences)H-Index: 19
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Changes in behaviour often drive rapid adaptive evolution and speciation. However, the mechanistic basis for behavioural shifts is largely unknown. The tephritid fruit fly Rhagoletis pomonella is a...
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#1Gero HilkenH-Index: 18
#2Jörg RosenbergH-Index: 12
Last. Andy Sombke (University of Vienna)H-Index: 13
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The tracheal system of scutigeromorph centipedes (Chilopoda) is special, as it consists of dorsally arranged unpaired spiracles. In this study, we investigate the tracheal systems of five different scutigeromorph species. They are strikingly similar to each other but depict unique characters compared to the tracheal systems of pleurostigmophoran centipedes, which has engendered an ongoing debate over a single versus independent origin of tracheal systems in Chilopoda. Up to now, only the respira...
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#1Philip O. M. Steinhoff (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 6
#2Gabriele Uhl (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 4
Last. Andy Sombke (University of Vienna)H-Index: 13
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Some animals have evolved task differentiation among their eyes. A particular example is spiders, where most species have eight eyes, of which two (the principal eyes) are used for object discrimination, whereas the other three pairs (secondary eyes) detect movement. In the ctenid spider Cupiennius salei, these two eye types correspond to two visual pathways in the brain. Each eye is associated with its own first- and second-order visual neuropil. The second-order neuropils of the principal eyes...
6 CitationsSource
#1Andy Sombke (University of Vienna)H-Index: 13
#2Anja E. Klann (American Board of Legal Medicine)H-Index: 2
Last. Harald Wolf (Stellenbosch University)H-Index: 28
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Background Arachnids possess highly specialized and unorthodox sense organs, such as the unique pectines of Scorpiones and the malleoli of Solifugae. While the external morphology, numbers, and shapes of sensory organs are widely used in taxonomic studies, little is known about the internal anatomy of these organs and their associated processing neuropils in the central nervous system. Camel spiders (Solifugae) possess pedipalps and first walking legs heavily endowed with sensory structures, as ...
2 CitationsSource
#1Christin Wittfoth (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 3
#2Steffen Harzsch (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 39
Last. Andy Sombke (University of Vienna)H-Index: 13
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Over the last years, the amphipod crustacean Parhyale hawaiensis has developed into an attractive marine animal model for evolutionary developmental studies that offers several advantages over existing experimental organisms. It is easy to rear in laboratory conditions with embryos available year-round and amenable to numerous kinds of embryological and functional genetic manipulations. However, beyond these developmental and genetic analyses, research on the architecture of its nervous system i...
8 CitationsSource
#1Philip O. M. Steinhoff (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 6
#2Gabriele Uhl (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 27
Last. Andy Sombke (University of Vienna)H-Index: 13
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Some animals have evolved task differentiation of individual structures within the same sensory modality (e.g. olfaction or vision). A particular example is spiders, where most species have eight eyes, of which two (the principle eyes) are used for object discrimination, whereas the other three pairs (secondary eyes) detect movement. In the model spider species Cupiennius salei (Keyserling, 1877) these two eye types correspond to two distinct visual pathways in the brain. Each eye is as...
1 CitationsSource
#1Matthes Kenning (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 6
#2Vanessa Schendel (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 2
Last. Andy Sombke (University of Greifswald)H-Index: 13
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Background In the context of evolutionary arthopodial transformations, centipede ultimate legs exhibit a plethora of morphological modifications and behavioral adaptations. Many species possess significantly elongated, thickened, or pincer-like ultimate legs. They are frequently sexually dimorphic, indicating a role in courtship and mating. In addition, glandular pores occur more commonly on ultimate legs than on walking legs, indicating a role in secretion, chemical communication, or predator a...
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