Boaz Keysar
University of Chicago
Foreign languageDevelopmental psychologyPsychologyEgocentrismCognitionFirst languageCognitive psychologyPerspective (graphical)MetaphorContext (language use)Perspective-takingAmbiguityMeaning (existential)LinguisticsNeuroscience of multilingualismComprehensionMeaning (linguistics)Social psychologySocial cognitionPsycholinguistics
74Publications
42H-index
7,911Citations
Publications 73
Newest
#1Yoella Bereby-Meyer (BGU: Ben-Gurion University of the Negev)H-Index: 20
#2Sayuri Hayakawa (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 9
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
view all 6 authors...
This project was supported by the Israel Science Foundation grant number 1337/11, by a grant from the University of Chicago's Wisdom Research Project and the John Templeton Foundation, a grant by the National Science Foundation #1520074 to the University of Chicago, a grant from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program (grant agreements: ERC‐StG‐637915), two grants by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (PSI2014‐5...
11 CitationsSource
#1James Vandermeer (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
#2Christine Hosey (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 2
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Negative escalation of social exchange exacts significant costs on both individuals and society. Instead of in-kind reciprocity—an eye for an eye—negative reciprocity may escalate, taking two eyes for an eye. We tested two competing mechanisms for negative escalation using a modified dictator game that reliably produces escalating reciprocity to others' negative actions but not to positive actions. According to one mechanism, escalation is strategic: a deliberate attempt to deter future...
2 CitationsSource
#1Alex Shaw (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 19
#2Anam Barakzai (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 4
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
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: If you are kind to me, I am likely to reciprocate and doing so feels fair. Many theories of social exchange assume that such reciprocity and fairness are well aligned with one another. We argue that this correspondence between reciprocity and fairness is restricted to interpersonal dyads and does not govern more complex multilateral interactions. When multiple people are involved, reciprocity leads to partiality, which may be seen as unfair by outsiders. We report seven studies, conducted with...
2 CitationsSource
#1Sayuri Hayakawa (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 9
#2Becky Ka Ying Lau (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 1
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
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People consider choices that involve risk on a daily basis. In principle, willingness to take risks should be independent of the language used while considering the available options. However, research has shown that using a foreign language can increase willingness to take risks, presumably because a foreign language is less emotional. Here, we investigate the robustness of this effect of language on risk by varying participant language background and methodological design features. In addition...
11 CitationsSource
#1Albert Costa (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 54
#2Joanna D. Corey (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 6
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
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We explore the origin of the foreign language effect on moral judgements by assessing whether language context alters the weight given to intentions and outcomes during moral judgement. Specifically, we investigated whether foreign language contexts, compared with native ones, may lead people to focus more on the outcomes of an action and less on the intentions behind it. We report two studies in which participants read scenarios in which the actor’s intentions and the resulting consequences wer...
6 CitationsSource
#1Albert Costa (UPF: Pompeu Fabra University)H-Index: 54
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
view all 3 authors...
6 CitationsSource
#1Constantinos Hadjichristidis (University of Leeds)H-Index: 13
#2Janet Geipel (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 7
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
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Abstract As a result of globalization, millions of people operate in a language that they comprehend well but is not their native tongue. This paper focuses on how the nativeness of the language of a communication influences judgments and decisions. We review studies that compare decision making while people use a native language to when they use a nonnative language they understand well. The evidence shows that a nonnative language decreases the impact that emotions and socio-moral norms have o...
3 CitationsSource
#1Shiri Lev-Ari (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 10
#2Emily V. Ho (UCSD: University of California, San Diego)H-Index: 6
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
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: Sociolinguistic research shows that listeners' expectations of speakers influence their interpretation of the speech, yet this is often ignored in cognitive models of language comprehension. Here, we focus on the case of interactions between native and non-native speakers. Previous literature shows that listeners process the language of non-native speakers in less detail, because they expect them to have lower linguistic competence. We show that processing the language of non-native speakers i...
7 CitationsSource
#1Sayuri Hayakawa (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 9
#2Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
Abstract Mental imagery plays a significant role in guiding how we feel, think, and even behave. These mental simulations are often guided by language, making it important to understand what aspects of language contribute to imagery vividness and consequently to the way we think. Here, we focus on the native-ness of language and present evidence that using a foreign language leads to less vivid mental imagery than using a native tongue. In Experiment 1, participants using a foreign language repo...
21 CitationsSource
#1Sayuri Hayakawa (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 9
#2David Tannenbaum (UofU: University of Utah)H-Index: 13
Last. Boaz Keysar (U of C: University of Chicago)H-Index: 42
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Would you kill one person to save five? People are more willing to accept such utilitarian action when using a foreign language than when using their native language. In six experiments, we investigated why foreign-language use affects moral choice in this way. On the one hand, the difficulty of using a foreign language might slow people down and increase deliberation, amplifying utilitarian considerations of maximizing welfare. On the other hand, use of a foreign language might stunt emotional ...
60 CitationsSource