R. Becket Ebitz
Université de Montréal
Salience (neuroscience)Social environmentDevelopmental psychologyCommon cause and special causeDynamics (music)PsychologyProsocial behaviorSet (psychology)NeuroscienceCognitionCognitive neuroscienceCoding (social sciences)Cognitive psychologyCognitive scienceVigilance (psychology)Working memoryDisengagement theoryDoctrineValue (mathematics)Orbitofrontal cortexVentral striatumPupilSocial decision makingAnterior cingulate cortexTask (project management)Field (Bourdieu)Prefrontal cortexPopulationChronic exposureMale miceNeuronal activationArousalComputer scienceInterpretation (philosophy)Cognitive flexibilityENCODELuminanceFunction (engineering)BiologyReinforcement learning
22Publications
10H-index
640Citations
Publications 23
Newest
#1R. Becket Ebitz (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 10
#2Benjamin Y. Hayden (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 50
A major shift is happening within neurophysiology: a population doctrine is drawing level with the single-neuron doctrine that has long dominated the field. Population-level ideas have so far had their greatest impact in motor neuroscience, but they hold great promise for resolving open questions in cognition as well. Here, we codify the population doctrine and survey recent work that leverages this view to specifically probe cognition. Our discussion is organized around five core concepts that ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Justin M. Fine (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 8
Last. Benjamin Y. Hayden (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 50
view all 4 authors...
To choose between options, we must solve two important binding problems. First, the features that determine each options values must be appropriately combined and kept separate from the corresponding features of other options. Second, options must be associated with the specific actions needed to select them. We hypothesized that the brain solves these problems through use of aligned (for bound dimensions) and orthogonal (for separated dimensions) population subspaces. We examined responses of s...
Source
#1Robert C. Wilson (UA: University of Arizona)H-Index: 20
#2Elizabeth Bonawitz (RU: Rutgers University)H-Index: 19
Last. R. Becket Ebitz (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 10
view all 4 authors...
Explore-exploit decisions require us to trade off the benefits of exploring unknown options to learn more about them, with exploiting known options, for immediate reward. Such decisions are ubiquitous in nature, but from a computational perspective, they are notoriously hard. There is therefore much interest in how humans and animals make these decisions and recently there has been an explosion of research in this area. Here we provide a biased and incomplete snapshot of this field focusing on t...
21 CitationsSource
A major shift is happening within neurophysiology: a population doctrine is drawing level with the single-neuron doctrine that has long dominated the field. Population-level ideas have so far had their greatest impact in motor neurophysiology, but they hold incredible promise for resolving open questions in cognition. Here, we codify the population doctrine and survey recent work that leverages this view to probe cognition. Our discussion is organized around five core concepts that provide a fou...
4 Citations
#1R. Becket Ebitz (UdeM: Université de Montréal)H-Index: 10
#2Benjamin Y. Hayden (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 50
A major shift is happening within neurophysiology: a population doctrine is drawing level with the single-neuron doctrine that has long dominated the field. Population-level ideas have so far had their greatest impact in motor neuroscience, but they hold great promise for resolving open questions in cognition as well. Here, we codify the population doctrine and survey recent work that leverages this view to specifically probe cognition. Our discussion is organized around five core concepts that ...
1 Citations
#1Brianna J. Sleezer (Cornell University)H-Index: 9
#2Ryan J Post (Cornell University)H-Index: 4
Last. Melissa R. Warden (Cornell University)H-Index: 17
view all 7 authors...
Survival requires both the ability to persistently pursue goals and the ability to determine when it is time to stop, an adaptive balance of perseverance and disengagement. Neural activity in the lateral habenula (LHb) has been linked to aversion and negative valence, but its role in regulating the balance between reward-seeking and disengaged behavioral states remains unclear. Here, we show that LHb neural activity is tonically elevated during minutes-long disengagements from reward-seeking beh...
Source
#1Cathy S. Chen (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 2
#2R. Becket Ebitz (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 10
Last. Nicola M. Grissom (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 19
view all 6 authors...
Summary A frequent assumption in value-based decision-making tasks is that agents make decisions based on the feature dimension that reward probabilities vary on. However, in complex, multidimensional environments, stimuli can vary on multiple dimensions at once, meaning that the feature deserving the most credit for outcomes is not always obvious. As a result, individuals may vary in the strategies used to sample stimuli across dimensions, and these strategies may have an unrecognized influence...
12 CitationsSource
#1Cathy S. Chen (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 2
#2Evan Knep (UMN: University of Minnesota)
Last. Nicola M. Grissom (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 19
view all 5 authors...
Sex differences in cognitive processes could set the stage for sex-modulated vulnerability to neuropsychiatric disorders. While value-based decision making processes in particular have been proposed to be influenced by sex differences, the overall correct performance across sexes often show minimal differences. Computational tools allow us to uncover latent variables in reinforcement learning that define different decision making approaches, even in animals with similar correct performance. Here...
1 CitationsSource
#1R. Becket Ebitz (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 10
#2Jiaxin Cindy Tu (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 3
Last. Benjamin Y. Hayden (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 50
view all 3 authors...
We have the capacity to follow arbitrary stimulus–response rules, meaning simple policies that guide our behavior. Rule identity is broadly encoded across decision-making circuits, but there are less data on how rules shape the computations that lead to choices. One idea is that rules could simplify these computations. When we follow a rule, there is no need to encode or compute information that is irrelevant to the current rule, which could reduce the metabolic or energetic demands of decision-...
6 CitationsSource
#1R. Becket Ebitz (UMN: University of Minnesota)H-Index: 10
#2Elliot H. SmithH-Index: 15
Last. Benjamin Y. HaydenH-Index: 50
view all 9 authors...
Hemodynamic activity in dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) correlates with conflict, suggesting it contributes to conflict processing. This correlation could be explained by multiple neural processes that can be disambiguated by population firing rates patterns. We used targeted dimensionality reduction to characterize activity of populations of single dACC neurons as humans performed a task that manipulates two forms of conflict. Although conflict enhanced firing rates, this enhancement di...
7 CitationsSource