Matthieu Raoelison
University of Paris
StatisticsIntuitionPsychologyCognitive psychologyCognitive scienceDevelopment (topology)DeliberationBlock (programming)Positive correlationChange analysisIntuitive thinkingIntuitive reasoningTime pressureMixed groupMathematicsComputer scienceProcess (engineering)Cognitive loadNegative feedbackBall (bearing)
4Publications
2H-index
12Citations
Publications 4
Newest
#1Matthieu T.S. Raoelison (University of Paris)H-Index: 4
#2Esther Boissin (University of Paris)
Last. Wim De Neys (University of Paris)H-Index: 37
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Recent reasoning accounts suggest that people can process elementary logical principles intuitively. These controversial “logical intuitions” are believed to result from a learning process in which...
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#1Matthieu T.S. Raoelison (University of Paris)H-Index: 4
#2Marine Keime (Glas.: University of Glasgow)H-Index: 1
Last. Wim De Neys (University of Paris)H-Index: 37
view all 3 authors...
Influential studies on human thinking with the popular two-response paradigm typically ask participants to continuously alternate between intuitive ("fast") and deliberate ("slow") responding. One concern is that repeated deliberation in these studies will artificially boost the intuitive, "fast" reasoning performance. A recent alternative two-block paradigm therefore advised to present all fast trials in one block before the slow trials were presented. Here, we tested directly whether allowing ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Matthieu T.S. Raoelison (University of Paris)H-Index: 4
#2Valerie A. Thompson (U of S: University of Saskatchewan)H-Index: 31
Last. Wim De Neys (University of Paris)H-Index: 37
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Abstract Cognitive capacity is commonly assumed to predict performance in classic reasoning tasks because people higher in cognitive capacity are believed to be better at deliberately correcting biasing erroneous intuitions. However, recent findings suggest that there can also be a positive correlation between cognitive capacity and correct intuitive thinking. Here we present results from 2 studies that directly contrasted whether cognitive capacity is more predictive of having correct intuition...
10 CitationsSource
#1Eva Janssen (UU: Utrecht University)H-Index: 9
#2Matthieu T.S. Raoelison (University of Paris)H-Index: 4
Last. Wim De Neys (University of Paris)H-Index: 37
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The popular bat-and-ball problem is a relatively simple math riddle on which people are easily biased by intuitive or heuristic thinking. In two studies we tested the impact of a simple but somewhat neglected manipulation - the impact of minimal accuracy feedback - on bat-and-ball performance. Participants solved a total of 15 standard and 15 control versions of the bat-and-ball problem in three consecutive blocks. Half of the participants received accuracy feedback in the intermediate block. Re...
5 CitationsSource