Chiara Longoni
Boston University
Valence (psychology)AdvertisingArtificial intelligencePsychologyHealth careSelfCognitive psychologyProcess simulationPoint (typography)PerceptionPsychological interventionNeglectReservationCredibilityPersuasionMedical decision makingConsumer resistanceResistance (psychoanalysis)Computer scienceProcess (engineering)Transformative learningIntelligence amplificationSocial psychology
17Publications
3H-index
117Citations
Publications 14
Newest
#1Romain Cadario (EUR: Erasmus University Rotterdam)H-Index: 6
#2Chiara Longoni (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Carey K. Morewedge (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 1
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Medical artificial intelligence is cost-effective, scalable, and often outperforms human providers. One important barrier to its adoption is the perception that algorithms are a “black box”—people do not subjectively understand how algorithms make medical decisions, and we find this impairs their utilization. We argue a second barrier is that people also overestimate their objective understanding of medical decisions made by human healthcare providers. In five pre-registered experiments with con...
Source
#1Chiara Longoni (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
#2Andrey Fradkin (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
Last. Gordon Pennycook (University of Regina)H-Index: 39
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Artificial Intelligence (AI) algorithms are now able to produce text virtually indistinguishable from text written by humans across a variety of domains. A key question, then, is whether people believe content from AI as much as content from humans. Trust in the (human generated) news media has been decreasing over time and AI is viewed as lacking human desires, and emotions, suggesting that AI news may be viewed as more accurate. Contrary to this, two preregistered experiments conducted on repr...
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#2Chiara Longoni (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Vicki G. Morwitz (Columbia University)H-Index: 36
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One of the most ubiquitous human judgments is that of probabilistic predictions. Past research has shown that probabilistic predictions are influenced by spatial distance: people judge spatially near events as more likely to occur than faraway ones. We show that outcome valence also matters, and document under what conditions the reverse effect occurs. Across eight hypothetical and incentive-compatible studies (combined N = 3,403), we provide evidence of a novel proximity bias, whereby spatial d...
Rapid development and adoption of AI, machine learning, and natural language processing applications challenge managers and policy makers to harness these transformative technologies. In this conte...
2 CitationsSource
#1Chiara LongoniH-Index: 3
#2Andrea BonezziH-Index: 8
Last. Carey K. MorewedgeH-Index: 27
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#1Luca CianH-Index: 7
#2Chiara Longoni (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Aradhna KrishnaH-Index: 55
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Ads promising a desired change are ubiquitous in the marketplace. These ads typically include visuals of the starting and ending point of the promised change (“before/after” ads). “Progression” ads...
1 CitationsSource
#1Chiara Longoni (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
#2Andrea Bonezzi (NYU: New York University)H-Index: 8
Last. Carey K. Morewedge (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 27
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Artificial intelligence (AI) is revolutionizing healthcare, but little is known about consumer receptivity to AI in medicine. Consumers are reluctant to utilize healthcare provided by AI in real and hypothetical choices, separate and joint evaluations. Consumers are less likely to utilize healthcare (study 1), exhibit lower reservation prices for healthcare (study 2), are less sensitive to differences in provider performance (studies 3A–3C), and derive negative utility if a provider is automated...
70 CitationsSource
#1Luca CianH-Index: 7
#2Aradhna KrishnaH-Index: 55
Last. Chiara LongoniH-Index: 3
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