Tyler J. VanderWeele
Harvard University
StatisticsCovariateMental healthPublic healthEconometricsDemographyOdds ratioPsychologyCausal inferenceCausalityObservational studyOutcome (probability)MEDLINEPopulationUnmeasured confoundingMathematicsComputer scienceMediation (statistics)MedicineConfounding
463Publications
87H-index
19.8kCitations
Publications 456
Newest
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#1Ying Chen (Harvard University)H-Index: 14
#2Christina Hinton (Harvard University)H-Index: 7
Last. Tyler J. VanderWeele (Harvard University)H-Index: 87
view all 3 authors...
While past empirical studies have explored associations between types of primary and secondary schools and student academic achievement, outcomes beyond academic performance remain less well-understood. Using longitudinal data from a cohort of children (N = 12,288, mean age = 14.56 years) of nurses, this study examined associations between the types of schools participants attended in adolescence and a wide range of subsequent psychological well-being, social engagement, character strengths, men...
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#1Nicholas SpenceH-Index: 9
#2Erica T. Warner (Harvard University)H-Index: 21
Last. Alexandra E. Shields (Harvard University)H-Index: 31
view all 7 authors...
The association between religion, spirituality, and body weight is controversial, given the methodological limitations of existing studies. Using the Nurses’ Health Study II cohort, follow-up occurred from 2001 to 2015, with up to 35,547 participants assessed for the religious or spiritual coping and religious service attendance analyses. Cox regression and generalized estimating equations evaluated associations with obesity and weight change, respectively. Religious or spiritual coping and reli...
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#1Maya B. MathurH-Index: 20
#2Louisa H. SmithH-Index: 5
Last. Tyler J. VanderWeeleH-Index: 87
view all 4 authors...
#8Higgins Jp (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 4
Mendelian randomisation (MR) studies allow a better understanding of the causal effects of modifiable exposures on health outcomes, but the published evidence is often hampered by inadequate reporting. Reporting guidelines help authors effectively communicate all critical information about what was done and what was found. STROBE-MR (strengthening the reporting of observational studies in epidemiology using mendelian randomisation) assists authors in reporting their MR research clearly and trans...
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#8Higgins Jp (UoB: University of Bristol)H-Index: 4
Importance null Mendelian randomization (MR) studies use genetic variation associated with modifiable exposures to assess their possible causal relationship with outcomes and aim to reduce potential bias from confounding and reverse causation. null Objective null To develop the STROBE-MR Statement as a stand-alone extension to the STROBE (Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) guideline for the reporting of MR studies. null Design, setting, and participants null Th...
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#1Jeff Levin (Baylor University)H-Index: 15
#2Ellen L. Idler (Emory University)H-Index: 39
Last. Tyler J. VanderWeele (Harvard University)H-Index: 87
view all 3 authors...
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#1Nicholas Spence (Harvard University)H-Index: 9
#2Erica T. Warner (Harvard University)H-Index: 21
Last. Alexandra E. Shields (Harvard University)H-Index: 31
view all 7 authors...
Abstract null null Purpose null To investigate religion and spirituality (R/S) as psychosocial factors in type 2 diabetes risk. null null null Methods null Using the Nurses’ Health Study II, we conducted a 14-year prospective analysis of 46,713 women with self-reported use of religion or spiritual beliefs to cope with stressful situations, and 42,825 women with self-reported religious service attendance, with respect to type 2 diabetes. Cox regression was used to assess the associations. . null ...
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#1Hopin Lee (University of Oxford)H-Index: 18
#2Aidan G Cashin (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 7
Last. Robert M. Golub (NU: Northwestern University)H-Index: 25
view all 21 authors...
Importance null Mediation analyses of randomized trials and observational studies can generate evidence about the mechanisms by which interventions and exposures may influence health outcomes. Publications of mediation analyses are increasing, but the quality of their reporting is suboptimal. null Objective null To develop international, consensus-based guidance for the reporting of mediation analyses of randomized trials and observational studies (A Guideline for Reporting Mediation Analyses; A...
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