Ariel Maschke
Boston University
PsychiatryEthnic groupPublic healthPsychologyContent analysisSet (psychology)Qualitative researchMedical physicsStakeholderPerceptionDrug overdoseHealth information technologyPlain languagePatient educationSexual violenceReadabilityBreast cancer screeningHealth literacyBrochureMEDLINEModalitiesWorryMammographyIntervention (counseling)Stakeholder engagementFentanylBreast Cancer Surveillance ConsortiumPrimary careLimited health literacyRisk communicationProcess knowledgeHospital patientsCommunity health workersStructural barriersBreast densityFamily medicineHarm reductionBreast cancerFocus groupDelphi methodMedicineThematic analysis
7Publications
3H-index
10Citations
Publications 9
Newest
PROBLEM: The potential for community-engaged research to address health inequity requires deliberate effort to create trusting and equitable community-academic partnerships. A lack of evidence-based opportunities for cultivating such partnerships remains a barrier. APPROACH: In 2017 and 2018 the authors designed, facilitated, and evaluated a mixed stakeholder training, Communicating to Engage, at 2 urban academic medical centers involved in the All of Us research program, Boston Medical Center a...
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#1Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
#2Ariel Maschke (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Tracy A. Battaglia (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 22
view all 7 authors...
Background. When stakeholders offer divergent input, it can be unclear how to prioritize information for decision aids (DAs) on mammography screening. Objectives. This analysis triangulates perspectives (breast cancer screening experts, primary care providers [PCPs], and patients with limited health literacy [LHL]) to understand areas of divergent and convergent input across stakeholder groups in developing a breast cancer screening DA for younger women with LHL. Design. A modified online Delphi...
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#1Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
#2Ariel Maschke (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Sarah M. Bagley (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 17
view all 7 authors...
Aims To explore how people who use fentanyl and health-care providers engaged in and responded to overdose risk communication interactions, and how these engagements and responses might vary by age. Design A single-site qualitative in-depth interview study. Setting Boston, MA, United States. Participants The sample included 21 people (10 women, 11 men) who were either 18-25 or 35+, English-speaking, and reported illicit fentanyl use in the last year and 10 health-care providers who worked direct...
1 CitationsSource
Abstract Background Standard public health approaches to risk communication do not address the gendered dynamics of drug use. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions of fentanyl-related risks among women and men to inform future risk communication approaches. Methods We conducted a qualitative study, purposively sampling English-speaking women and men, aged 18–25 or 35+ years, with past 12-month illicitly manufactured fentanyl use. In-depth individual interviews explored experiences of ...
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#1Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
#2Ariel Maschke (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
Last. Tracy A. Battaglia (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 22
view all 6 authors...
Limited health literacy is a driver of cancer disparities and associated with less participation in medical decisions. Mammography screening decisions are an exemplar of where health literacy may impact decision-making and outcomes. To describe informational needs and shared decision-making (SDM) experiences among women ages 40–54 who have limited health literacy and primary care providers (PCPs). Qualitative, in-depth interviews explored experiences with mammography counseling and SDM. Women ag...
2 CitationsSource
#1Ariel Maschke (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 3
#2Michael K. Paasche-Orlow (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 60
Last. Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
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Starting breast cancer screening at age 40 versus 50 may increase potential harms frequency with a small mortality benefit. Younger women's screening decisions, therefore, may be complex. Shared decision-making (SDM) is recommended for women under 50 and may support women under 55 for whom guidelines vary. How women with limited health literacy (LHL) approach breast cancer screening decision-making is less understood, and most SDM tools are not designed with their input. This phenomenological st...
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#1Erica T. Warner (Harvard University)H-Index: 20
#2Mark Kennedy (Boston Public Health Commission)H-Index: 2
Last. Christine M. Gunn (Boston Public Health Commission)H-Index: 1
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Abstract Objectives In this pilot study, we developed and assessed acceptability of a brochure for women with dense breasts. Material and Methods We measured Flesch-Kincaid Readability of 22 existing breast density educational materials. We then developed a brochure and tested it in two populations of women: 44 safety net hospital patients and 13 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium stakeholders. Results Average grade score of existing materials was 10.0 (range: 5.5–12.7). Our brochure had a gr...
2 CitationsSource
#1Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 2
#1Christine M. Gunn (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 9
Last. Erica T. Warner (Harvard University)H-Index: 20
view all 8 authors...
Half of women undergoing mammography have dense breasts. Mandatory dense breast notification and educational materials have been shown to confuse women, rather than empower them. This study used a mixed method, multi-stakeholder approach to assess acceptability of an interactive, computer-animated agent that provided breast density information to women and changes in knowledge, satisfaction, and informational needs. A pre-post survey and qualitative focus groups assessed the acceptability of the...
5 CitationsSource