Julie A. Woodzicka
Washington and Lee University
StatisticsPrejudice (legal term)Gender studiesComputer-mediated communicationSelf-efficacySocial environmentProvocation testTeamworkPragmaticsEmpirical researchNorm (social)Replication (statistics)Developmental psychologyRacismConceptual frameworkAttributionSocial psychology (sociology)Nonverbal communicationAssertivenessPsychologySelf-awarenessApplied linguisticsJob performancePedagogyChemistry (relationship)PerceptionGeneralizability theoryNeglectState (polity)Well-beingPopular beliefJob interviewInstitution (computer science)JokeStereotype threatStereotypeCollective actionSocial supportWhite privilegeIdentification (psychology)Variation (linguistics)Self-objectificationHarassmentUndergraduate researchAmusementFace (sociological concept)Diversity (business)Expression (architecture)Context (language use)Generalization (learning)Scope (project management)Foundation (evidence)ReplicateDiversity (politics)Ambivalent sexismIncreased toleranceFeeling angryHuman FemalesInstant messagingGender gapTheory buildingSocial powerSex biasSocial consequenceStimulus samplingComprehension testResearch skillsCivil rightsExperimental researchGender relationsFemale studentsLived experienceModerate to severeGroup dynamicNegative emotionA determinantPrejudiceEducational researchLinguisticsSample (statistics)Priming (psychology)Reliability (statistics)SpeculationMedical educationComprehensionHumor researchReading (process)AnxietyStatistical significanceClinical psychologyCognitive dissonanceSocial psychologyPath analysis (statistics)VictimologyExploratory researchOperationalizationPoliticsMeta-analysisPopular cultureConservatismSocial identity theory
25Publications
13H-index
1,369Citations
Publications 24
Newest
#1Julie A. Woodzicka (W&L: Washington and Lee University)H-Index: 13
#2Jessica J. Good (Davidson College)H-Index: 13
Confronting sexism has been routinely operationalized in experimental research as assertive behavior that expresses disapproval of sexism. The present research examines an indirect confrontation st...
1 CitationsSource
#1Julie A. WoodzickaH-Index: 13
#2Robyn K. MallettH-Index: 21
Source
#1Jessica J. Good (Davidson College)H-Index: 13
#2Julie A. Woodzicka (W&L: Washington and Lee University)H-Index: 13
Last. Kimberly A. Bourne (UW: University of Washington)H-Index: 2
view all 3 authors...
Research on confronting prejudice frequently defines an effective confrontation as one that induces change in the perpetrator's prejudicial beliefs or actions. We argue for a broader definition, defining successful confrontation as one that elicits the confronter's desired response. Using a community sample of 152 adults, we conducted an exploratory study in which participants recalled a time when they had confronted racism or sexism. Results revealed a frequent mismatch between what confronters...
Source
#1Julie A. Woodzicka (W&L: Washington and Lee University)H-Index: 13
#2Robyn K. Mallett (LUC: Loyola University Chicago)H-Index: 21
Last. Kala J. Melchiori (JMU: James Madison University)H-Index: 4
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#1Robyn K. Mallett (LUC: Loyola University Chicago)H-Index: 21
#2Thomas E. Ford (WCU: Western Carolina University)H-Index: 21
Last. Julie A. Woodzicka (W&L: Washington and Lee University)H-Index: 13
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ABSTRACTWomen often ignore gender harassment (i.e., sexism). Two studies tested whether ignoring real or imagined sexism increases tolerance of sexual harassment and decreases support for survivors...
Source
#1Jessica J. Good (Davidson College)H-Index: 13
#2Julie A. Woodzicka (W&L: Washington and Lee University)H-Index: 13
Last. Corinne A. Moss-Racusin (Skidmore College)H-Index: 22
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Abstract Recent media campaigns, news articles, and political events have spotlighted sexism and collective action against sexism. In the face of these injustices, some women and men decide to confront sexist events, whereas others do not. In this chapter, we focus on the factors that motivate people to confront sexism with particular attention to the ways in which confrontations of sexism might be unique. We first consider the integral role of recognizing sexism in predicting confronting behavi...
1 CitationsSource
#1Richard A. KleinH-Index: 8
#2Michelangelo Vianello (UNIPD: University of Padua)H-Index: 16
Last. Brian A. Nosek (Center for Open Science)H-Index: 93
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We conducted preregistered replications of 28 classic and contemporary published findings, with protocols that were peer reviewed in advance, to examine variation in effect magnitudes across samples and settings. Each protocol was administered to approximately half of 125 samples that comprised 15,305 participants from 36 countries and territories. Using the conventional criterion of statistical significance (p < .05), we found that 15 (54%) of the replications provided evidence of a statistical...
155 CitationsSource
2 CitationsSource
#1Thomas E. Ford (WCU: Western Carolina University)H-Index: 21
#2Sabrina R. Teeter (UNCG: University of North Carolina at Greensboro)H-Index: 1
Last. Julie A. Woodzicka (W&L: Washington and Lee University)H-Index: 13
view all 4 authors...
ABSTRACTWhen people high in prejudice censor prejudice in one setting, they can experience a prejudice rebound effect—subsequently responding with more prejudice than otherwise. Disparagement humor fosters the release rather than suppression of prejudice. Thus, two experiments tested the hypothesis that exposure to disparagement humor attenuates rebound effects. Participants suppressed prejudice by writing fewer anti-gay thoughts about same-sex adoption (Experiment 1) or by reporting greater sup...
3 CitationsSource
#1Robyn K. Mallett (LUC: Loyola University Chicago)H-Index: 21
#2Thomas E. Ford (WCU: Western Carolina University)H-Index: 21
Last. Julie A. Woodzicka (W&L: Washington and Lee University)H-Index: 13
view all 3 authors...
Sexist humor may be more difficult to confront than serious expressions of sexism because humor disguises the biased nature of the remark. The present research investigated whether delivering a sexist remark as a joke, compared to a serious statement, tempered perceptions that the speaker was sexist which, in turn, made women less likely to confront. Using a computer-mediated instant messaging paradigm, women were randomly assigned to receive the same sexist remark phrased either in a serious ma...
22 CitationsSource
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