Kayleigh L. Banyard
Hull York Medical School
TransgeneMatrix metalloproteinaseDownregulation and upregulationPhenotypeChemokineRegeneration (biology)ChemistryExtracellular matrixTHP1 cell lineTransferrinDirect reduced ironOxidative stressMacrophage polarizationInflammationHuman skinMacrophageErythropoiesisWound healingM2 MacrophageCancer researchSenescenceMedicineParacrine signallingCXC chemokine receptorsCell biology
3Publications
3H-index
40Citations
Publications 3
Newest
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Elizabeth Rose Roberts (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 1
Last. Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 34
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Macrophages are important for effective iron recycling and erythropoiesis, but also play a crucial role in wound healing, orchestrating tissue repair. Recently, we demonstrated a significant accumulation of iron in healing wounds, and a requirement of iron for effective repair. Here, we sought to determine the influence of iron on macrophage function in the context of wound healing. Interestingly, wound macrophages extensively sequestered iron throughout healing, associated with a pro-h...
14 CitationsSource
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Sophie E. Upson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 1
Last. Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 34
view all 6 authors...
Iron is crucial for maintaining normal bodily function with well-documented roles in erythropoiesis, hemostasis, and inflammation. Despite this, little is known about the temporal regulation of iron during wound healing, or how iron contributes to wound biology and pathology. In this study, we profiled tissue iron levels across a healing time-course, identifying iron accumulation during late-stage repair. Diabetic murine wounds displayed significantly reduced iron levels, delayed extracellular m...
8 CitationsSource
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Christopher Clowes (Royal Stoke University Hospital)H-Index: 1
Last. Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 34
view all 6 authors...
Cellular senescence can be broadly defined as a stable, but essentially irreversible, loss of proliferative capacity. Historically, senescence has been described as a negative outcome of advanced cellular age. It is now clear, however, that senescence represents a dynamic autonomous stress response, integral to long-term tumor suppression. Transient induction of a senescent phenotype has actually been suggested to promote regeneration in both liver and skin. Here, we explored the role of senesce...
23 CitationsSource