Omar Farahat
McGill University
Value theoryEpistemologyPhilosophySociologyKinshipShariaPhilosophical theologyLaw and economicsLawReligious studiesTheologyRevelationDeliberationIslamic ethicsVirtueHarmIdentity (social science)Action (philosophy)ScholarshipRule of recognitionImperative moodModernityDutyPolitical statusRelation (history of concept)Substantive lawCitizenshipMeaning (existential)Foundation (evidence)Balance (metaphysics)Islamic studiesIslamic philosophyIslamNormativeDivine command theoryInterpretation (philosophy)Reading (process)JurisprudenceFiqhCommercial lawMoral reasoningPolitics
8Publications
1H-index
5Citations
Publications 7
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This paper presents three theoretical accounts developed to assess the moral value and legal status of acts designed to promote commercial gain in the thought of major classical Muslim scholars. There has been an increased recent interest in Islamic commercial law and ethics in recent years. Much of the recent scholarship consists of practically inclined studies that tend to lump the Islamic tradition of evaluation of commerce under the principles of social justice and avoidance of harm. Our stu...
This chapter examines some of the central concepts of human community and belonging and their implications in a number of classical legal and exegetical works. This is done by highlighting early and classical Islamic concepts that occupied a place comparable to ideas of nation and citizenship, understood as a specific form of political status and identity, or the “need to belong to a community,” (as described in Heater 1990, 182), with an emphasis on the disciplines of Quranic exegesis and subst...
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In this book, Omar Farahat presents a new way of understanding the work of classical Islamic theologians and legal theorists who maintained that divine revelation is necessary for the knowledge of the norms and values of human actions. Through a reconstruction of classical Ashʿarī-Muʿtazilī debates on the nature and implications of divine speech, Farahat argues that the Ashʿarī attachment to revelation was not a purely traditionalist position. Rather, it was a rational philosophical commitment e...
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This article offers an analysis of the way a number of classical Muslim scholars treated the question of the normative impact of statements in the imperative mood. This question, which was standard in classical works of legal theory, is noteworthy for its direct implication in establishing links between linguistic forms and normative positions. It reveals to us with some clarity the logic of norm-formation in part of the tradition. It will be argued that the debates surrounding the normative imp...
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