Jennifer Wellington
University of Maryland, Baltimore
SwallowingInternal medicineRadiologyLumen (anatomy)EtiologySurgeryIntensive care medicineClosure (topology)SpasticFecal incontinenceAbscessPerforation (oil well)EsophagusAsymptomaticInflammatory bowel diseasePeriUrinary incontinenceHemostasisChest painLeukocytosisDiseaseCrohn's diseaseDysphagia lusoriaHiccupsBowel obstructionDiarrheaAchalasiaRegurgitation (digestion)Rectal examinationUlcerative colitisDysphagiaEsophageal motility disorderAbdominal painEsophagramEsophageal DisorderTransplantationGastrointestinal endoscopyEsophageal myotomyIntractable hiccupsEndoscopic hemostasisHigh resolutionBolus (digestion)Weight lossMedicineCohortGastroenterology
9Publications
1H-index
1Citations
Publications 8
Newest
#1Jennifer Wellington (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 1
#2Joseph Kim (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 1
Last. Guofeng Xie (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 15
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Dysphagia lusoria is a rare cause of dysphagia due to impingement of the esophagus by an aberrant right subclavian artery. Although most remain asymptomatic, this aberrant vessel can lead to progressive dysphagia in childhood or even later in life as a result of arteriosclerotic burden and attenuation of esophageal compliance that led to esophageal compression. We present a 56-year-old man with a 3-year history of progressively worsening dysphagia to solids and liquids and globus sensation. Vide...
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#1Natasha Kamal (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)
#2Kiran Motwani (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)
Last. Raymond K. Cross (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 29
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#2Grace E. KimH-Index: 1
Last. Raymond E. KimH-Index: 4
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#1Jennifer Wellington (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 1
#2Andrew Canakis (BU: Boston University)H-Index: 5
Last. Raymond E. Kim (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 4
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#2Daniel G. HwangH-Index: 1
Last. Raymond E. KimH-Index: 4
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1 CitationsSource
#1Kaci E. Christian (University of Maryland Medical Center)H-Index: 1
Last. Guofeng XieH-Index: 1
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: Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder of impaired lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and absent peristalsis. The presenting symptoms are commonly dysphagia, chest pain, regurgitation, and weight loss. Hiccups have been associated with gastrointestinal diseases but uncommonly associated with achalasia. We present a 62-year-old man with a history of dysphagia, weight loss, and intractable hiccups. High-resolution impedance manometry revealed Type I achalasia, which was treated with per...
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#1Seema Patil (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 10
#2Sandra M. Quezada (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 9
Last. Jennifer Wellington (UMB: University of Maryland, Baltimore)H-Index: 1
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Immunocompromised patients often lack the classic clinical abdominal pain presentations, making the etiology difficult to ascertain. Knowledge of the patient’s immunocompromised status, whether it is due to chemotherapy, transplantation, HIV, or autoimmune disease, will help clinicians assess the unique complications that arise in each of these patient populations. In patients with an immunocompromised status, localized infections can quickly become systemic, and timing of antibiotic administrat...
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