Nitzan Levy
University of California, San Francisco
Response elementEndocrinologyRegulation of gene expressionEstrogen receptor alphaChemistryEstrogenTamoxifenSelective estrogen receptor modulatorPhytoestrogensLiquiritigeninAgonistRaloxifeneRaloxifene HydrochlorideCancer researchHormone response elementEstrogen receptorTranscription factorBiologyEstrogen receptor betaPharmacology
6Publications
6H-index
259Citations
Publications 6
Newest
#1Nitzan Levy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 6
#2Sreenivasan Paruthiyil (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 12
Last. Dale C. Leitman (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 26
view all 10 authors...
Tamoxifen can stimulate the growth of some breast tumors and others can become resistant to tamoxifen. We previously showed that unliganded ERβ inhibits ERα-mediated proliferation of MCF-7 cells. We investigated if tamoxifen might have a potential negative effect on some breast cancer cells by blocking the effects of unliganded ERβ on gene regulation. Gene expression profiles demonstrated that unliganded ERβ upregulated 196 genes in MCF-7 cells. Tamoxifen significantly inhibited 73 of these gene...
16 CitationsSource
#1Lonnele J. Ball (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 2
#2Nitzan Levy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 6
Last. Dale C. Leitman (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 26
view all 10 authors...
Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), such as tamoxifen and raloxifene can act as estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists or agonists depending on the cell type. The antagonistic action of tamoxifen has been invaluable for treating breast cancer, whereas the agonist activity of SERMs also has important clinical applications as demonstrated by the use of raloxifene for osteoporosis. Whereas the mechanism whereby SERMs function as antagonists has been studied extensively very little is known ...
29 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer Mersereau (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 17
#2Nitzan Levy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 6
Last. Dale C. Leitman (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 26
view all 11 authors...
a Departments of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences and Center for Reproductive Sciences, Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States b Bionovo Inc., Emeryville, CA, United States c Departments of Urology, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, United States d Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of Cali...
13 CitationsSource
#1Jennifer Mersereau (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 17
#2Nitzan Levy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 6
Last. Dale C. Leitman (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 26
view all 11 authors...
Abstract After the Women's Health Initiative found that the risks of hormone therapy outweighed the benefits, a need for alternative drugs to treat menopausal symptoms has emerged. We explored the possibility that botanical agents used in Traditional Chinese Medicine for menopausal symptoms contain ERβ-selective estrogens. We previously reported that an extract containing 22 herbs, MF101 has ERβ-selective properties. In this study we isolated liquiritigenin, the most active estrogenic compound f...
190 CitationsSource
#1Nitzan Levy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 6
#2Dierdre Tatomer (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 1
Last. Dale C. LeitmanH-Index: 26
view all 10 authors...
Estrogen receptors (ERs) regulate gene transcription by interacting with regulatory elements. Most information regarding how ER activates genes has come from studies using a small set of target genes or simple consensus sequences such as estrogen response element, activator protein 1, and Sp1 elements. However, these elements cannot explain the differences in gene regulation patterns and clinical effects observed with estradiol (E2) and selective estrogen receptor modulators. To obtain a greater...
53 CitationsSource
#1Nitzan Levy (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 6
#2Xiaoyue Zhao (University of California, Berkeley)H-Index: 9
Last. Dale C. Leitman (UCSF: University of California, San Francisco)H-Index: 26
view all 6 authors...
Estrogen receptors (ERs) regulate transcription by interacting with regulatory elements in target genes. However, known ER regulatory elements cannot explain the expression profiles of genes activated by estradiol (E2) and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). We previously showed that the killer cell lectin-like receptor (NKG2E) gene is regulated by E2, tamoxifen, and raloxifene. Here we used the NKG2E gene as a model to investigate the mechanism whereby target genes are regulated by ...
27 CitationsSource
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