Holly N. Wilkinson
Hull York Medical School
Cooperative breedingPathologyRegeneration (biology)ChemistryExtracellular matrixEx vivoHuman skinNegative-pressure wound therapyMacrophageWound healingChronic woundAgeingCancer researchSenescenceBiofilmBioinformaticsMedicineCXC chemokine receptorsBiologyCell biology
22Publications
8H-index
156Citations
Publications 22
Newest
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 32
The skin is the body's primary defence against the external environment, preventing infection and desiccation. Therefore, alterations to skin homeostasis, for example with skin ageing, increase susceptibility to skin disease and injury. Skin biological ageing is uniquely influenced by a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic (primarily photoageing) factors, with differential effects on skin structure and function. Interestingly, skin architecture rapidly changes following the menopause, as a dir...
Source
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Francesca L. Longhorne (Hull York Medical School)
Last. Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 32
view all 5 authors...
Negative pressure wound therapy is a widely used treatment for chronic, nonhealing wounds. Surprisingly, few studies have systematically evaluated the cellular and molecular effects of negative pressure treatment on human skin. In addition, no study to date has directly compared recently available single-use negative pressure modalities to traditional negative pressure devices in a controlled setting. Here we developed a novel large-scale ex vivo human skin culture system to effectively evaluate...
Source
Chronic non-healing wounds, which primarily affect the elderly and diabetic, are a significant area of clinical unmet need. Unfortunately, current chronic wound treatments are inadequate, while available pre-clinical models poorly predict the clinical efficacy of new therapies. Here we describe a high throughput, pre-clinical model to assess multiple aspects of the human skin repair response. Partial thickness wounds were created in human ex vivo skin and cultured across a healing time course. S...
Source
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 32
Arguably, the two most important causes of pathological healing in the skin are diabetes and ageing. While these factors have historically been considered independent modifiers of the healing process, recent studies suggest that they may be mechanistically linked. The primary contributor to diabetic pathology is hyperglycaemia, which accelerates the production of advanced glycation end products, a characteristic of ageing tissue. Indeed, advanced age also leads to mild hyperglycaemia. Here, we d...
8 CitationsSource
#1Varuni R. Brownhill (Smith & Nephew)H-Index: 1
#2Elizabeth Mary Huddleston (Smith & Nephew)H-Index: 6
Last. Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
view all 7 authors...
Objective: Traditional negative pressure wound therapy systems can be large and cumbersome, limiting patient mobility and adversely affecting quality of life. PICO™, a no canister single-use system offers a lightweight, portable alternative to traditional negative pressure wound therapy, with improved clinical performance. The aim of this study was to determine the potential mechanism(s) of action of single-use negative pressure wound therapy versus traditional negative pressure wound therapy. A...
2 CitationsSource
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 32
Wound healing is a complex, dynamic process supported by a myriad of cellular events that must be tightly coordinated to efficiently repair damaged tissue. Derangement in wound-linked cellular beha...
7 CitationsSource
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 32
Cellular senescence is a fundamental stress response that restrains tumour formation. Yet, senescence cells are also present in non-cancerous states, accumulating exponentially with chronological age and contributing to age- and diabetes-related cellular dysfunction. The identification of hypersecretory and phagocytic behaviours in cells that were once believed to be non-functional has led to a recent explosion of senescence research. Here we discuss the profound, and often opposing, roles ident...
4 CitationsSource
#1David Scully (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 3
#2Peggy Sfyri (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 4
Last. Antonios MatsakasH-Index: 18
view all 11 authors...
Promoting cell proliferation is the cornerstone of most tissue regeneration therapies. As platelet‐based applications promote cell division and can be customised for tissue‐specific efficacy, this makes them strong candidates for developing novel regenerative therapies. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if platelet releasate could be optimised to promote cellular proliferation and differentiation of specific tissues. Growth factors in platelet releasate were profiled for physiolo...
3 CitationsSource
#1Laura R. Sadofsky (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 12
#2Yvette A. Hayman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 3
Last. Alyn H. Morice (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 2
view all 9 authors...
Purpose There is currently no true macrophage cell line and in vitro experiments requiring these cells currently require mitogenic stimulation of a macrophage precursor cell line (THP-1) or ex vivo maturation of circulating primary monocytes. In this study, we characterise a human macrophage cell line, derived from THP-1 cells, and compare its phenotype to the THP-1 cells.
Source
#1Holly N. Wilkinson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 8
#2Sophie E. Upson (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 1
Last. Matthew J. Hardman (Hull York Medical School)H-Index: 32
view all 6 authors...
Iron is crucial for maintaining normal bodily function with well-documented roles in erythropoiesis, hemostasis, and inflammation. Despite this, little is known about the temporal regulation of iron during wound healing, or how iron contributes to wound biology and pathology. In this study, we profiled tissue iron levels across a healing time-course, identifying iron accumulation during late-stage repair. Diabetic murine wounds displayed significantly reduced iron levels, delayed extracellular m...
6 CitationsSource