Peter R. Judzewitsch
University of New South Wales
Solid-state chemistryChain transferThroughput (business)PhotopolymerCopolymerMonomerNanotechnologyChemical reactionChemistryMaterials scienceProcess engineeringCombinatorial chemistryAntimicrobial polymerMycobacterium smegmatisSinglet oxygenPseudomonas aeruginosaScientific methodSequence (biology)Production (economics)Staphylococcus aureusSILKPolymer brushEnergy sourceReaction dynamicsFlow (mathematics)PolymerizationAntimicrobialPolymerAntimicrobial peptidesBiofilmBiofoulingPhotocatalysisRaftAntibiotic resistance
6Publications
4H-index
205Citations
Publications 7
Newest
#1Peter R. Judzewitsch (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
#2Nathaniel Corrigan (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 19
Last. Cyrille Boyer (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 90
view all 4 authors...
This work presents the synthesis of a novel photosensitive acrylate monomer for use as both a self-catalyst in the photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) polymerisation process and a photosensitiser (PS) for antibacterial applications. Hydrophilic, cationic, and antimicrobial formulations are explored to compare the antibacterial effects between charged and non-charged polymers. Covalent attachment of the catalyst to well-defined linear ...
1 CitationsSource
#1Gervase Ng (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 5
#2Peter R. Judzewitsch (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
Last. Cyrille Boyer (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 90
view all 6 authors...
Biofilms are a persistent issue in healthcare and industry. Once formed, the eradication of biofilms is challenging as the extracellular polymeric matrix provides protection against harsh environmental conditions and physically enhances resistance to antimicrobials. The fabrication of polymer brush coatings provides a versatile approach to modify the surface to resist the formation of biofilms. Herein, the authors report a facile synthetic route for the preparation of surface-tethered polymeric ...
3 CitationsSource
#1Erna Wulandari (UNSW: University of New South Wales)
#2Rashin Namivandi-Zangeneh (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 9
Last. Edgar H. H. Wong (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 27
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The development of robust scaffolds with an inherent antimicrobial property is important for a range of biomedical applications, such as wound healing. In this study, we report the facile fabricati...
Source
#1Peter R. Judzewitsch (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
#2Nathaniel Corrigan (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 19
Last. Cyrille Boyer (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 90
view all 8 authors...
The combination of high-throughput (HTP) processes and flow-mediated synthesis allows large data sets to be generated quickly while also permitting large quantities of materials to be prepared in a continuous fashion. In this work, the benefits of well-plate-based HTP polymerization and flow-mediated chemistry are used to streamline the screening and upscaling of value-added biomedical materials through a robust photopolymerization strategy, namely, photoinduced electron/energy transfer-reversib...
19 CitationsSource
#1Peter R. Judzewitsch (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
#2Lily Zhao (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 2
Last. Cyrille Boyer (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 90
view all 4 authors...
The growing trend in antimicrobial resistance is a potential threat to our society. Due to this, the development of new antimicrobial compounds is urgently required. High-throughput compositional analysis, combined with recent advances in polymerization protocols, allows for rapid production of potentially antimicrobial compounds with minimal expertise. This can provide the impetus for correlating activity with composition and functionality. In this study, we have used high-throughput photoinduc...
32 CitationsSource
#1Nathaniel Corrigan (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 19
#2Jonathan Yeow (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 22
Last. Cyrille Boyer (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 90
view all 5 authors...
: The application of photochemistry to polymer and material science has led to the development of complex yet efficient systems for polymerization, polymer post-functionalization, and advanced materials production. Using light to activate chemical reaction pathways in these systems not only leads to exquisite control over reaction dynamics, but also allows complex synthetic protocols to be easily achieved. Compared to polymerization systems mediated by thermal, chemical, or electrochemical means...
202 CitationsSource
#1Peter R. Judzewitsch (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 4
#2Thuy-Khanh Nguyen (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 10
Last. Cyrille Boyer (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 90
view all 5 authors...
: Synthetic polymers have shown promise in combating multidrug-resistant bacteria. However, the biological effects of sequence control in synthetic antimicrobial polymers are currently not well understood. As such, we investigate the antimicrobial effects of monomer distribution within linear high-order quasi-block copolymers consisting of aminoethyl, phenylethyl, and hydroxyethyl acrylamides made in a one-pot synthesis approach via photoinduced electron transfer-reversible addition-fragmentatio...
76 CitationsSource