Jorge Durán
University of Coimbra
EcosystemMineralization (soil science)Climate changeGrowing seasonNutrientSoil classificationSoil waterNitrificationSpatial heterogeneityEcologySnowGlobal changeWater contentPinus canariensisChronosequenceSoil fertilityEnvironmental scienceGreenhouse gasNitrogen cycleSoil testAgronomyTerrestrial ecosystemDenitrificationForest ecologyAbundance (ecology)BiologyAtmospheric sciencesSpatial variability
54Publications
20H-index
792Citations
Publications 54
Newest
#1Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo (Pablo de Olavide University)H-Index: 52
#2David J. Eldridge (UNSW: University of New South Wales)H-Index: 68
Last. Adebola R. Bamigboye (OAU: Obafemi Awolowo University)H-Index: 1
view all 36 authors...
The structure and function of the soil microbiome of urban greenspaces remain largely undetermined. We conducted a global field survey in urban greenspaces and neighboring natural ecosystems across 56 cities from six continents, and found that urban soils are important hotspots for soil bacterial, protist and functional gene diversity, but support highly homogenized microbial communities worldwide. Urban greenspaces had a greater proportion of fast-growing bacteria, algae, amoebae, and fungal pa...
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#1Jorge Durán (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 20
#2Alexandra Rodríguez (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 15
Last. A. de los Ríos (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 16
view all 4 authors...
Abstract Soils can influence climate by sequestering or emitting greenhouse gases (GHG) such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). We are far from understanding the direct influence of cryptogamic covers on soil GHG fluxes, particularly in areas free of potential anthropogenic confounding factors. We assessed the role of well-developed cryptogamic covers in soil attributes, as well as in the in-situ exchange of GHG between Antarctic soils and the atmosphere during the ...
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#1María José Fernández-Alonso (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 3
#2Alexandra Rodríguez (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 15
Last. Jorge Durán (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 20
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Abstract Climate change-driven increases in aridity will lead to dryland expansion worldwide. In the Atlantic and Mediterranean biogeographic regions, coastal dunes are priority conservation areas highly sensitive to aridification where plants and biological soil crusts may play a key role maintaining ecosystem services. However, we still need further insights into the balance between the effects of increasing aridity and the influence of local vegetation on the soil attributes and functioning o...
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Abstract We still lack studies that provide evidence for direct links between the development of soil surface cryptogamic communities and soil attributes and functioning. This is particularly true in areas free of potentially confounding factors such as different soil types, land uses, or anthropogenic disturbances. Despite the ecological importance of polar ecosystems and their sensitivity to climate change, we are far from understanding how their soils function and will respond to climate chan...
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#1Álvaro del Moral (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 2
#2Isaac Garrido-Benavent (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 8
Last. Asunción de los Ríos (CSIC: Spanish National Research Council)H-Index: 29
view all 7 authors...
Polar glacier forefields offer an unprecedented framework for studying community assembly processes in regions that are geographically and climatically isolated. Through amplicon sequence variant (ASV) inference, we compared the composition and structure of soil bacterial communities from glacier forefields in Iceland and Antarctica to assess overlap between communities and the impact of established cryptogamic covers on the uniqueness of their taxa. These pioneer microbial communities were foun...
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#1Jorge Durán (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 20
#2Manuel Delgado-Baquerizo (Pablo de Olavide University)H-Index: 52
The factors controlling the spatial variability of soil biodiversity remain largely undetermined. We conducted a global field survey to evaluate how and why the within-site spatial variability of soil biodiversity (i.e. richness and community composition) changes across global biomes with contrasting soil ages, climates and vegetation types. We found that the spatial variability of bacteria, fungi, protists, and invertebrates is positively correlated across ecosystems. We also show that the spat...
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#1Geoffrey W. WilsonH-Index: 2
#2Mark B. Green (USFS: United States Forest Service)H-Index: 2
Last. Jennifer L. Morse (PSU: Portland State University)H-Index: 26
view all 7 authors...
Variations in snow depth have complex effects on soil microclimate. Snow insulates soil and thus regulates, along with air temperature, the nature, and extent of soil freezing. There is great uncertainty about the main drivers of soil freezing, which have important effects on ecosystem carbon and nitrogen cycling processes and might change as climate warms and snowfall decreases as part of climate change. Here, we utilitze sites from a variety of elevations and aspects within the northern hardwo...
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#1Laura García-Velázquez (Pablo de Olavide University)H-Index: 6
#2Alexandra Rodríguez (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 15
Last. Jorge Durán (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 20
view all 10 authors...
This project was financed by FEDER/Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovacion y Universidades-Agencia Estatal de Investigacion/Proyect (CGL2017-88124-R), European Research Council (ERC Grant Agreement 647038 [BIODESERT]) and the Fundaca o para Ciencia e Tecnologia (IF/00950/2014) and the FEDER, within the PT2020 Partnership Agreement and COMPETE 2020 (UID/BIA/04004/2013). F.T.M. acknowledges support from Generalitat Valenciana (CIDEGENT/2018/041). B.K.S. acknowledge research support on microbes and ecosy...
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#1Angela Lafuente (URJC: King Juan Carlos University)H-Index: 6
#2Jaime Recio (UPM: Technical University of Madrid)H-Index: 5
Last. Jorge Durán (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 20
view all 7 authors...
Abstract Soil nitrogen (N) availability is a key driver of soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange, yet we are far from understanding how increases in N deposition due to human activities will influence the net soil-atmosphere fluxes of the three most important GHGs: nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2). We simulated four levels of N deposition (10, 20 and 50 kg N ha−1 yr−1, plus unfertilised control) to evaluate their effects on N2O, CH4 and CO2 soil fluxes in a sem...
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#1Antonio Gallardo (Pablo de Olavide University)H-Index: 51
#2José María Fernández-Palacios (ULL: University of La Laguna)H-Index: 41
Last. Alexandra Rodríguez (UC: University of Coimbra)H-Index: 15
view all 8 authors...
The Walker and Syers model predict that phosphorus (P) availability decreases with time leading to a final stage known as retrogression. We tested the validity of the Walker and Syers model in the Canary Islands, a soil chronosequence ranging from 300 years to 11 million years under recurrent episodes of atmospheric dust-containing P inputs. In particular, we compared our results with those from the volcanic soil chronosequences described in the Hawaii Islands and in Arizona, as they share key b...
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